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Mongolian spots.
Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2013 Jul-Aug; 79(4):469-78IJ

Abstract

Mongolian spots (MS) are birthmarks that are present at birth and their most common location is sacrococcygeal or lumbar area. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually involve < 5% total body surface area. They are macular and round, oval or irregular in shape. The color varies from blue to greenish, gray, black or a combination of any of the above. The size varies from few to more than 20 centimetres. Pigmentation is most intense at the age of one year and gradually fades thereafter. It is rarely seen after the age of 6 years. Aberrant MS over occiput, temple, mandibular area, shoulders and limbs may be confused with other dermal melanocytoses and bruises secondary to child abuse, thus necessitating documentation at birth. Although regarded as benign, recent data suggest that MS may be associated with inborn errors of metabolism and neurocristopathies. Mongolian spots usually resolve by early childhood and hence no treatment is generally needed if they are located in the sacral area. However, sometimes it may be required for extrasacral lesions for cosmesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Pondicherry, India.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23760316

Citation

Gupta, Divya, and Devinder Mohan Thappa. "Mongolian Spots." Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, vol. 79, no. 4, 2013, pp. 469-78.
Gupta D, Thappa DM. Mongolian spots. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol. 2013;79(4):469-78.
Gupta, D., & Thappa, D. M. (2013). Mongolian spots. Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, 79(4), pp. 469-78. doi:10.4103/0378-6323.113074.
Gupta D, Thappa DM. Mongolian Spots. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol. 2013;79(4):469-78. PubMed PMID: 23760316.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mongolian spots. AU - Gupta,Divya, AU - Thappa,Devinder Mohan, PY - 2013/6/14/entrez PY - 2013/6/14/pubmed PY - 2014/2/14/medline SP - 469 EP - 78 JF - Indian journal of dermatology, venereology and leprology JO - Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol VL - 79 IS - 4 N2 - Mongolian spots (MS) are birthmarks that are present at birth and their most common location is sacrococcygeal or lumbar area. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually involve < 5% total body surface area. They are macular and round, oval or irregular in shape. The color varies from blue to greenish, gray, black or a combination of any of the above. The size varies from few to more than 20 centimetres. Pigmentation is most intense at the age of one year and gradually fades thereafter. It is rarely seen after the age of 6 years. Aberrant MS over occiput, temple, mandibular area, shoulders and limbs may be confused with other dermal melanocytoses and bruises secondary to child abuse, thus necessitating documentation at birth. Although regarded as benign, recent data suggest that MS may be associated with inborn errors of metabolism and neurocristopathies. Mongolian spots usually resolve by early childhood and hence no treatment is generally needed if they are located in the sacral area. However, sometimes it may be required for extrasacral lesions for cosmesis. SN - 0973-3922 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23760316/Mongolian_spots_ L2 - http://www.ijdvl.com/article.asp?issn=0378-6323;year=2013;volume=79;issue=4;spage=469;epage=478;aulast=Gupta DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -