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Neuropsychological impairments in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder: findings from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) study.
Am J Psychiatry 2013; 170(11):1275-84AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Familial neuropsychological deficits are well established in schizophrenia but remain less well characterized in other psychotic disorders. This study from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) consortium 1) compares cognitive impairment in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with psychosis, 2) tests a continuum model of cognitive dysfunction in psychotic disorders, 3) reports familiality of cognitive impairments across psychotic disorders, and 4) evaluates cognitive impairment among nonpsychotic relatives with and without cluster A personality traits.

METHOD

Participants included probands with schizophrenia (N=293), psychotic bipolar disorder (N=227), schizoaffective disorder (manic, N=110; depressed, N=55), their first-degree relatives (N=316, N=259, N=133, and N=64, respectively), and healthy comparison subjects (N=295). All participants completed the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) neuropsychological battery.

RESULTS

Cognitive impairments among psychotic probands, compared to healthy comparison subjects, were progressively greater from bipolar disorder (z=-0.77) to schizoaffective disorder (manic z=-1.08; depressed z=-1.25) to schizophrenia (z=-1.42). Profiles across subtests of the BACS were similar across disorders. Familiality of deficits was significant and comparable in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Of particular interest were similar levels of neuropsychological deficits in relatives with elevated cluster A personality traits across proband diagnoses. Nonpsychotic relatives of schizophrenia probands without these personality traits exhibited significant cognitive impairments, while relatives of bipolar probands did not.

CONCLUSIONS

Robust cognitive deficits are present and familial in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder. Severity of cognitive impairments across psychotic disorders was consistent with a continuum model, in which more prominent affective features and less enduring psychosis were associated with less cognitive impairment. Cognitive dysfunction in first-degree relatives is more closely related to psychosis-spectrum personality disorder traits in psychotic bipolar disorder than in schizophrenia.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23771174

Citation

Hill, S Kristian, et al. "Neuropsychological Impairments in Schizophrenia and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder: Findings From the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network On Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) Study." The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 170, no. 11, 2013, pp. 1275-84.
Hill SK, Reilly JL, Keefe RS, et al. Neuropsychological impairments in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder: findings from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) study. Am J Psychiatry. 2013;170(11):1275-84.
Hill, S. K., Reilly, J. L., Keefe, R. S., Gold, J. M., Bishop, J. R., Gershon, E. S., ... Sweeney, J. A. (2013). Neuropsychological impairments in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder: findings from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) study. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 170(11), pp. 1275-84. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2013.12101298.
Hill SK, et al. Neuropsychological Impairments in Schizophrenia and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder: Findings From the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network On Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) Study. Am J Psychiatry. 2013;170(11):1275-84. PubMed PMID: 23771174.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neuropsychological impairments in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder: findings from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) study. AU - Hill,S Kristian, AU - Reilly,James L, AU - Keefe,Richard S E, AU - Gold,James M, AU - Bishop,Jeffrey R, AU - Gershon,Elliot S, AU - Tamminga,Carol A, AU - Pearlson,Godfrey D, AU - Keshavan,Matcheri S, AU - Sweeney,John A, PY - 2013/6/18/entrez PY - 2013/6/19/pubmed PY - 2013/12/29/medline SP - 1275 EP - 84 JF - The American journal of psychiatry JO - Am J Psychiatry VL - 170 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Familial neuropsychological deficits are well established in schizophrenia but remain less well characterized in other psychotic disorders. This study from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) consortium 1) compares cognitive impairment in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with psychosis, 2) tests a continuum model of cognitive dysfunction in psychotic disorders, 3) reports familiality of cognitive impairments across psychotic disorders, and 4) evaluates cognitive impairment among nonpsychotic relatives with and without cluster A personality traits. METHOD: Participants included probands with schizophrenia (N=293), psychotic bipolar disorder (N=227), schizoaffective disorder (manic, N=110; depressed, N=55), their first-degree relatives (N=316, N=259, N=133, and N=64, respectively), and healthy comparison subjects (N=295). All participants completed the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) neuropsychological battery. RESULTS: Cognitive impairments among psychotic probands, compared to healthy comparison subjects, were progressively greater from bipolar disorder (z=-0.77) to schizoaffective disorder (manic z=-1.08; depressed z=-1.25) to schizophrenia (z=-1.42). Profiles across subtests of the BACS were similar across disorders. Familiality of deficits was significant and comparable in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Of particular interest were similar levels of neuropsychological deficits in relatives with elevated cluster A personality traits across proband diagnoses. Nonpsychotic relatives of schizophrenia probands without these personality traits exhibited significant cognitive impairments, while relatives of bipolar probands did not. CONCLUSIONS: Robust cognitive deficits are present and familial in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder. Severity of cognitive impairments across psychotic disorders was consistent with a continuum model, in which more prominent affective features and less enduring psychosis were associated with less cognitive impairment. Cognitive dysfunction in first-degree relatives is more closely related to psychosis-spectrum personality disorder traits in psychotic bipolar disorder than in schizophrenia. SN - 1535-7228 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23771174/Neuropsychological_impairments_in_schizophrenia_and_psychotic_bipolar_disorder:_findings_from_the_Bipolar_Schizophrenia_Network_on_Intermediate_Phenotypes__B_SNIP__study_ L2 - https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/appi.ajp.2013.12101298?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -