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Coffee and tea consumption are inversely associated with mortality in a multiethnic urban population.
J Nutr 2013; 143(8):1299-308JN

Abstract

Coffee and tea are commonly consumed beverages. Inverse associations with mortality have been suggested for coffee and tea, but the relationships with cause-specific mortality are not well understood. We examined regular and decaffeinated coffee and tea in relation to mortality due to all causes, vascular, nonvascular, and cancer in the multi-ethnic, prospective, population-based Northern Manhattan Study. The study population included 2461 participants with diet data who were free of stroke, myocardial infarction, and cancer at baseline (mean age 68.30 ± 10.23 y, 36% men, 19% white, 23% black, 56% Hispanic). During a mean follow-up of 11 y, we examined the associations between coffee and tea consumption, assessed by food frequency questionnaire, and 863 deaths (342 vascular related and 444 nonvascular including 160 cancer deaths) using multivariable-adjusted Cox models. Coffee consumption was inversely associated with all-cause mortality [for each additional cup/d, HR = 0.93 (95% CI: 0.88, 0.99); P = 0.02]. Caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with all-cause mortality, driven by a strong protection among those who drank ≥4 cups/d. An inverse dose-response relationship between tea and all-cause mortality was suggested [for each additional cup/d, HR = 0.91 (95% CI: 0.84, 0.99); P = 0.01]. Coffee consumption ≥4/d was protective against nonvascular death [vs. <1/mo, HR = 0.57 (95% CI: 0.33, 0.97)] and tea consumption ≥2/d was protective against nonvascular death [HR = 0.63 (95% CI: 0.41, 0.95)] and cancer [HR = 0.33 (95% CI: 0.14, 0.80)]. There was a strong inverse association between coffee and vascular-related mortality among Hispanics only. Further study is needed, including investigation into the mechanisms and compounds in coffee and tea responsible for the inverse associations with mortality. The differential relationship between coffee and vascular death across race/ethnicity underscores the need for research in similar multi-ethnic cohorts including Hispanics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA. hgardener@med.miami.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23784068

Citation

Gardener, Hannah, et al. "Coffee and Tea Consumption Are Inversely Associated With Mortality in a Multiethnic Urban Population." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 143, no. 8, 2013, pp. 1299-308.
Gardener H, Rundek T, Wright CB, et al. Coffee and tea consumption are inversely associated with mortality in a multiethnic urban population. J Nutr. 2013;143(8):1299-308.
Gardener, H., Rundek, T., Wright, C. B., Elkind, M. S., & Sacco, R. L. (2013). Coffee and tea consumption are inversely associated with mortality in a multiethnic urban population. The Journal of Nutrition, 143(8), pp. 1299-308. doi:10.3945/jn.112.173807.
Gardener H, et al. Coffee and Tea Consumption Are Inversely Associated With Mortality in a Multiethnic Urban Population. J Nutr. 2013;143(8):1299-308. PubMed PMID: 23784068.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee and tea consumption are inversely associated with mortality in a multiethnic urban population. AU - Gardener,Hannah, AU - Rundek,Tatjana, AU - Wright,Clinton B, AU - Elkind,Mitchell S V, AU - Sacco,Ralph L, Y1 - 2013/06/19/ PY - 2013/6/21/entrez PY - 2013/6/21/pubmed PY - 2013/9/24/medline SP - 1299 EP - 308 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 143 IS - 8 N2 - Coffee and tea are commonly consumed beverages. Inverse associations with mortality have been suggested for coffee and tea, but the relationships with cause-specific mortality are not well understood. We examined regular and decaffeinated coffee and tea in relation to mortality due to all causes, vascular, nonvascular, and cancer in the multi-ethnic, prospective, population-based Northern Manhattan Study. The study population included 2461 participants with diet data who were free of stroke, myocardial infarction, and cancer at baseline (mean age 68.30 ± 10.23 y, 36% men, 19% white, 23% black, 56% Hispanic). During a mean follow-up of 11 y, we examined the associations between coffee and tea consumption, assessed by food frequency questionnaire, and 863 deaths (342 vascular related and 444 nonvascular including 160 cancer deaths) using multivariable-adjusted Cox models. Coffee consumption was inversely associated with all-cause mortality [for each additional cup/d, HR = 0.93 (95% CI: 0.88, 0.99); P = 0.02]. Caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with all-cause mortality, driven by a strong protection among those who drank ≥4 cups/d. An inverse dose-response relationship between tea and all-cause mortality was suggested [for each additional cup/d, HR = 0.91 (95% CI: 0.84, 0.99); P = 0.01]. Coffee consumption ≥4/d was protective against nonvascular death [vs. <1/mo, HR = 0.57 (95% CI: 0.33, 0.97)] and tea consumption ≥2/d was protective against nonvascular death [HR = 0.63 (95% CI: 0.41, 0.95)] and cancer [HR = 0.33 (95% CI: 0.14, 0.80)]. There was a strong inverse association between coffee and vascular-related mortality among Hispanics only. Further study is needed, including investigation into the mechanisms and compounds in coffee and tea responsible for the inverse associations with mortality. The differential relationship between coffee and vascular death across race/ethnicity underscores the need for research in similar multi-ethnic cohorts including Hispanics. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23784068/Coffee_and_tea_consumption_are_inversely_associated_with_mortality_in_a_multiethnic_urban_population_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.112.173807 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -