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Maternal sensitivity buffers the adrenocortical implications of intimate partner violence exposure during early childhood.
Dev Psychopathol. 2011 May; 23(2):689-701.DP

Abstract

This study prospectively examined the effect of intimate partner violence (IPV) on adrenocortical reactivity and recovery during early childhood. The sample (n = 1102 mother-infant dyads; 49.2% male) was racially diverse and from predominantly low-income, rural communities. To measure IPV exposure mothers completed the Conflicts Tactics Scale, and her caretaking behaviors were observed when her child was approximately 7, 15, and 24 months of age. Children's saliva samples, later assayed for cortisol, were collected around challenge tasks designed to elicit emotional reactivity. IPV was related to a trajectory of increased cortisol reactivity from infancy to toddlerhood. By contrast, the trajectory for non-IPV-exposed children decreased in cortisol reactivity across 7 to 24 months of age. At the 24-month assessment, on average, toddlers did not exhibit a cortisol reaction; however, those exposed to high levels of violence continued to have reactivity. Accumulative levels of IPV across the first 2 years of life predicted cortisol reactivity at 24 months of age. Early (7-month) sensitive maternal behavior moderated this relationship, so that only children exposed to both early insensitivity and high accumulated IPV exhibited increased reactivity at the 24-month assessment. Findings are discussed in relation to the risky family framework.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child Development and Family Studies, 101 Gates Road, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906, USA. Hibel@purdue.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23786704

Citation

Hibel, Leah C., et al. "Maternal Sensitivity Buffers the Adrenocortical Implications of Intimate Partner Violence Exposure During Early Childhood." Development and Psychopathology, vol. 23, no. 2, 2011, pp. 689-701.
Hibel LC, Granger DA, Blair C, et al. Maternal sensitivity buffers the adrenocortical implications of intimate partner violence exposure during early childhood. Dev Psychopathol. 2011;23(2):689-701.
Hibel, L. C., Granger, D. A., Blair, C., & Cox, M. J. (2011). Maternal sensitivity buffers the adrenocortical implications of intimate partner violence exposure during early childhood. Development and Psychopathology, 23(2), 689-701. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954579411000010
Hibel LC, et al. Maternal Sensitivity Buffers the Adrenocortical Implications of Intimate Partner Violence Exposure During Early Childhood. Dev Psychopathol. 2011;23(2):689-701. PubMed PMID: 23786704.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal sensitivity buffers the adrenocortical implications of intimate partner violence exposure during early childhood. AU - Hibel,Leah C, AU - Granger,Douglas A, AU - Blair,Clancy, AU - Cox,Martha J, AU - ,, PY - 2013/6/22/entrez PY - 2011/5/1/pubmed PY - 2014/2/8/medline SP - 689 EP - 701 JF - Development and psychopathology JO - Dev Psychopathol VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - This study prospectively examined the effect of intimate partner violence (IPV) on adrenocortical reactivity and recovery during early childhood. The sample (n = 1102 mother-infant dyads; 49.2% male) was racially diverse and from predominantly low-income, rural communities. To measure IPV exposure mothers completed the Conflicts Tactics Scale, and her caretaking behaviors were observed when her child was approximately 7, 15, and 24 months of age. Children's saliva samples, later assayed for cortisol, were collected around challenge tasks designed to elicit emotional reactivity. IPV was related to a trajectory of increased cortisol reactivity from infancy to toddlerhood. By contrast, the trajectory for non-IPV-exposed children decreased in cortisol reactivity across 7 to 24 months of age. At the 24-month assessment, on average, toddlers did not exhibit a cortisol reaction; however, those exposed to high levels of violence continued to have reactivity. Accumulative levels of IPV across the first 2 years of life predicted cortisol reactivity at 24 months of age. Early (7-month) sensitive maternal behavior moderated this relationship, so that only children exposed to both early insensitivity and high accumulated IPV exhibited increased reactivity at the 24-month assessment. Findings are discussed in relation to the risky family framework. SN - 1469-2198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23786704/Maternal_sensitivity_buffers_the_adrenocortical_implications_of_intimate_partner_violence_exposure_during_early_childhood_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0954579411000010/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -