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Effects of synbiotic food consumption on metabolic status of diabetic patients: a double-blind randomized cross-over controlled clinical trial.
Clin Nutr. 2014 Apr; 33(2):198-203.CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

We are aware of no study indicating the effects of synbiotic food consumption on metabolic profiles, inflammation and oxidative stress among diabetic patients. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of synbiotic food consumption on metabolic profiles, hs-CRP and biomarkers of oxidative stress in diabetic patients.

METHODS

This randomized double-blinded cross-over controlled clinical trial was performed among 62 diabetic patients aged 35-70 y. After a 2-wk run-in period, subjects were randomly assigned to consume either a synbiotic (n = 62) or control food (n = 62) for 6 weeks. A 3-week washout period was applied following which subjects were crossed over to the alternate treatment arm for an additional 6 weeks. The synbiotic food consisted of a probiotic viable and heat-resistant Lactobacillus sporogenes (1 × 10(7) CFU), 0.04 g inulin (HPX) as prebiotic with 0.38 g isomalt, 0.36 g sorbitol and 0.05 g stevia as sweetener per 1 g. Control food (the same substance without probiotic bacteria and prebiotic inulin) was packed in identical 9-gram packages. Patients were asked to consume the synbiotic and control foods three times a day. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after a 6-wk intervention to measure metabolic profiles, hs-CRP and biomarkers of oxidative stress.

RESULTS

Consumption of a synbiotic food, compared to the control, resulted in a significant decrease in serum insulin levels (changes from baseline: -1.75 ± 0.60 vs. +0.95 ± 1.09 μIU/mL, P = 0.03). Although we failed to find a significant effect of synbiotic food consumption on total- and LDL-cholesterol levels and HOMA-IR, the effects on FPG (22.3 vs. 4.2 mg/dL, P = 0.09), serum triglycerides (45.9 vs. 20.6 mg/dL, P = 0.08) and HDL-cholesterol levels (3.1 vs. -2 mg/dL, P = 0.06) tended to be significant. A significant reduction in serum hs-CRP levels (-1057.86 ± 283.74 vs. 95.40 ± 385.38 ng/mL, P = 0.01) was found following the consumption of synbiotic food compared with the control group. Supplementation with the synbiotic food led to a significant increase in plasma total GSH (319.98 vs. 19.73 μmol/L, P < 0.001) and serum uric acid levels (+0.7 vs. -0.1 mg/dL, P = 0.04) compared to the control food. No significant effect of the synbiotic food was observed on plasma TAC levels.

CONCLUSIONS

In conclusion, consumption of a synbiotic food for 6 weeks among diabetic patients had significant effects on serum insulin, hs-CRP, uric acid and plasma total GSH levels.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER

www.irct.ir: IRCT201201195623N1.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.Department of Nursing and Midwifery, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran.Department of Research and Development of Sekkeh Gaz Company, Isfahan, Iran.Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Electronic address: Esmaillzadeh@hlth.mui.ac.ir.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23786900

Citation

Asemi, Zatollah, et al. "Effects of Synbiotic Food Consumption On Metabolic Status of Diabetic Patients: a Double-blind Randomized Cross-over Controlled Clinical Trial." Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), vol. 33, no. 2, 2014, pp. 198-203.
Asemi Z, Khorrami-Rad A, Alizadeh SA, et al. Effects of synbiotic food consumption on metabolic status of diabetic patients: a double-blind randomized cross-over controlled clinical trial. Clin Nutr. 2014;33(2):198-203.
Asemi, Z., Khorrami-Rad, A., Alizadeh, S. A., Shakeri, H., & Esmaillzadeh, A. (2014). Effects of synbiotic food consumption on metabolic status of diabetic patients: a double-blind randomized cross-over controlled clinical trial. Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), 33(2), 198-203. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2013.05.015
Asemi Z, et al. Effects of Synbiotic Food Consumption On Metabolic Status of Diabetic Patients: a Double-blind Randomized Cross-over Controlled Clinical Trial. Clin Nutr. 2014;33(2):198-203. PubMed PMID: 23786900.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of synbiotic food consumption on metabolic status of diabetic patients: a double-blind randomized cross-over controlled clinical trial. AU - Asemi,Zatollah, AU - Khorrami-Rad,Ashraf, AU - Alizadeh,Sabihe-Alsadat, AU - Shakeri,Hossein, AU - Esmaillzadeh,Ahmad, Y1 - 2013/06/07/ PY - 2013/01/12/received PY - 2013/05/22/revised PY - 2013/05/23/accepted PY - 2013/6/22/entrez PY - 2013/6/22/pubmed PY - 2014/11/19/medline KW - Diabetes KW - Inflammation KW - Insulin KW - Oxidative stress KW - Plasma glucose KW - Synbiotic SP - 198 EP - 203 JF - Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) JO - Clin Nutr VL - 33 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: We are aware of no study indicating the effects of synbiotic food consumption on metabolic profiles, inflammation and oxidative stress among diabetic patients. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of synbiotic food consumption on metabolic profiles, hs-CRP and biomarkers of oxidative stress in diabetic patients. METHODS: This randomized double-blinded cross-over controlled clinical trial was performed among 62 diabetic patients aged 35-70 y. After a 2-wk run-in period, subjects were randomly assigned to consume either a synbiotic (n = 62) or control food (n = 62) for 6 weeks. A 3-week washout period was applied following which subjects were crossed over to the alternate treatment arm for an additional 6 weeks. The synbiotic food consisted of a probiotic viable and heat-resistant Lactobacillus sporogenes (1 × 10(7) CFU), 0.04 g inulin (HPX) as prebiotic with 0.38 g isomalt, 0.36 g sorbitol and 0.05 g stevia as sweetener per 1 g. Control food (the same substance without probiotic bacteria and prebiotic inulin) was packed in identical 9-gram packages. Patients were asked to consume the synbiotic and control foods three times a day. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after a 6-wk intervention to measure metabolic profiles, hs-CRP and biomarkers of oxidative stress. RESULTS: Consumption of a synbiotic food, compared to the control, resulted in a significant decrease in serum insulin levels (changes from baseline: -1.75 ± 0.60 vs. +0.95 ± 1.09 μIU/mL, P = 0.03). Although we failed to find a significant effect of synbiotic food consumption on total- and LDL-cholesterol levels and HOMA-IR, the effects on FPG (22.3 vs. 4.2 mg/dL, P = 0.09), serum triglycerides (45.9 vs. 20.6 mg/dL, P = 0.08) and HDL-cholesterol levels (3.1 vs. -2 mg/dL, P = 0.06) tended to be significant. A significant reduction in serum hs-CRP levels (-1057.86 ± 283.74 vs. 95.40 ± 385.38 ng/mL, P = 0.01) was found following the consumption of synbiotic food compared with the control group. Supplementation with the synbiotic food led to a significant increase in plasma total GSH (319.98 vs. 19.73 μmol/L, P < 0.001) and serum uric acid levels (+0.7 vs. -0.1 mg/dL, P = 0.04) compared to the control food. No significant effect of the synbiotic food was observed on plasma TAC levels. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, consumption of a synbiotic food for 6 weeks among diabetic patients had significant effects on serum insulin, hs-CRP, uric acid and plasma total GSH levels. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: www.irct.ir: IRCT201201195623N1. SN - 1532-1983 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23786900/Effects_of_synbiotic_food_consumption_on_metabolic_status_of_diabetic_patients:_a_double_blind_randomized_cross_over_controlled_clinical_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0261-5614(13)00154-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -