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Two-dimensional analysis of head-shaking nystagmus in patients with Meniere's disease.
J Vestib Res. 2013 Jan 01; 23(2):95-100.JV

Abstract

The HSN test is a simple examination that can be easily performed by clinicians, however only a few studies have analyzed the 2-dimensional characteristics of HSN in patients with MD. The objective of the study was to characterize different types of 2-dimensional head-shaking nystagmus (HSN) in patients with Meniere's disease (MD). Sixty-five patients with definite MD were enrolled. HSN was considered pathologic, if slow-phase velocity (SPV) was ≥ 4°/s and was classified as paretic or recovery according to the direction, and as monophasic or biphasic according to the presence of direction change. HSN was categorized as pure horizontal, mixed or pure vertical. When vertical SPV was larger than horizontal SPV, HSN was categorized as perverted. Forty-four patients (68%) had pathologic HSN and 28 patients (43%) had pathologic canal paresis. Monophasic-paretic HSN was the most common and followed by biphasic-paretic HSN, monophasic-recovery HSN and biphasic-recovery HSN. Delayed-peak monophasic-paretic HSN, which was not observed in vestibular neuritis, was found in 6 patients with MD. Thirty-three patients (51%) had a vertical component, which was monophasic and downbeat in 32 (97%). Every pathologic HSN in horizontal plane had higher SPV in horizontal plane than that of vertical plane. Perverted HSN was found in 4 patients, of whom 3 had pure vertical and one had mixed type HSN. Our data showed that HSN is a sensitive detector of vestibular dysfunction. HSN showed diverse types with a new type of delayed-peak HSN. Vertical components of HSN were observed in about half, but they were negligible compared to horizontal components. Weak perverted HSN (vertical SPV ≤ 4°/s) could be found in patients with MD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23788137

Citation

Kim, C-H, et al. "Two-dimensional Analysis of Head-shaking Nystagmus in Patients With Meniere's Disease." Journal of Vestibular Research : Equilibrium & Orientation, vol. 23, no. 2, 2013, pp. 95-100.
Kim CH, Shin JE, Kim TS, et al. Two-dimensional analysis of head-shaking nystagmus in patients with Meniere's disease. J Vestib Res. 2013;23(2):95-100.
Kim, C. H., Shin, J. E., Kim, T. S., Shim, B. S., & Park, H. J. (2013). Two-dimensional analysis of head-shaking nystagmus in patients with Meniere's disease. Journal of Vestibular Research : Equilibrium & Orientation, 23(2), 95-100. https://doi.org/10.3233/VES-130478
Kim CH, et al. Two-dimensional Analysis of Head-shaking Nystagmus in Patients With Meniere's Disease. J Vestib Res. 2013 Jan 1;23(2):95-100. PubMed PMID: 23788137.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Two-dimensional analysis of head-shaking nystagmus in patients with Meniere's disease. AU - Kim,C-H, AU - Shin,J E, AU - Kim,T S, AU - Shim,B S, AU - Park,H J, PY - 2013/6/22/entrez PY - 2013/6/22/pubmed PY - 2014/1/28/medline SP - 95 EP - 100 JF - Journal of vestibular research : equilibrium & orientation JO - J Vestib Res VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - The HSN test is a simple examination that can be easily performed by clinicians, however only a few studies have analyzed the 2-dimensional characteristics of HSN in patients with MD. The objective of the study was to characterize different types of 2-dimensional head-shaking nystagmus (HSN) in patients with Meniere's disease (MD). Sixty-five patients with definite MD were enrolled. HSN was considered pathologic, if slow-phase velocity (SPV) was ≥ 4°/s and was classified as paretic or recovery according to the direction, and as monophasic or biphasic according to the presence of direction change. HSN was categorized as pure horizontal, mixed or pure vertical. When vertical SPV was larger than horizontal SPV, HSN was categorized as perverted. Forty-four patients (68%) had pathologic HSN and 28 patients (43%) had pathologic canal paresis. Monophasic-paretic HSN was the most common and followed by biphasic-paretic HSN, monophasic-recovery HSN and biphasic-recovery HSN. Delayed-peak monophasic-paretic HSN, which was not observed in vestibular neuritis, was found in 6 patients with MD. Thirty-three patients (51%) had a vertical component, which was monophasic and downbeat in 32 (97%). Every pathologic HSN in horizontal plane had higher SPV in horizontal plane than that of vertical plane. Perverted HSN was found in 4 patients, of whom 3 had pure vertical and one had mixed type HSN. Our data showed that HSN is a sensitive detector of vestibular dysfunction. HSN showed diverse types with a new type of delayed-peak HSN. Vertical components of HSN were observed in about half, but they were negligible compared to horizontal components. Weak perverted HSN (vertical SPV ≤ 4°/s) could be found in patients with MD. SN - 1878-6464 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23788137/Two_dimensional_analysis_of_head_shaking_nystagmus_in_patients_with_Meniere's_disease_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/VES-130478 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -