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Dietary bioactive compounds and their health implications.
J Food Sci 2013; 78 Suppl 1:A18-25JF

Abstract

There is strong scientific evidence suggesting that regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is negatively associated with risk of developing chronic diseases. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend at least 9 servings of fruits and vegetables a day based on a 2000 kcal diet. However, the average person in the United States consumes 3.6 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. In order to achieve the goal of at least 9 servings, we should continue educating Americans about the health benefits of fruits and vegetables and recommend consumers to eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables. The key is to increase the amount up to 9 to 13 servings of fruits and vegetables a day in all forms. Fresh, cooked, and processed fruits and vegetables including frozen and canned, 100% fruit juices, 100% vegetable juices, and dried fruits are all considered as servings of fruits and vegetables. A wide variety of fruits and vegetables provide a range of nutrients and different bioactive compounds including phytochemicals (phenolics, flavonoids, and carotenoids), vitamins (vitamin C, folate, and provitamin A), minerals (potassium, calcium, and magnesium), and fibers. More and more evidence suggests that the health benefits of fruits and vegetables are attributed to the additive and synergistic interactions of the phytochemicals present in whole foods by targeting multiple signal transduction pathways. Therefore, consumers should obtain nutrients and bioactive compounds from a wide variety of whole foods for optimal nutrition and health well-being, not from expensive dietary supplements.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, U.S.A. RL23@cornell.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23789932

Citation

Liu, Rui Hai. "Dietary Bioactive Compounds and Their Health Implications." Journal of Food Science, vol. 78 Suppl 1, 2013, pp. A18-25.
Liu RH. Dietary bioactive compounds and their health implications. J Food Sci. 2013;78 Suppl 1:A18-25.
Liu, R. H. (2013). Dietary bioactive compounds and their health implications. Journal of Food Science, 78 Suppl 1, pp. A18-25. doi:10.1111/1750-3841.12101.
Liu RH. Dietary Bioactive Compounds and Their Health Implications. J Food Sci. 2013;78 Suppl 1:A18-25. PubMed PMID: 23789932.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary bioactive compounds and their health implications. A1 - Liu,Rui Hai, PY - 2012/10/04/received PY - 2013/01/31/accepted PY - 2013/6/25/entrez PY - 2013/6/29/pubmed PY - 2014/1/18/medline SP - A18 EP - 25 JF - Journal of food science JO - J. Food Sci. VL - 78 Suppl 1 N2 - There is strong scientific evidence suggesting that regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is negatively associated with risk of developing chronic diseases. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend at least 9 servings of fruits and vegetables a day based on a 2000 kcal diet. However, the average person in the United States consumes 3.6 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. In order to achieve the goal of at least 9 servings, we should continue educating Americans about the health benefits of fruits and vegetables and recommend consumers to eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables. The key is to increase the amount up to 9 to 13 servings of fruits and vegetables a day in all forms. Fresh, cooked, and processed fruits and vegetables including frozen and canned, 100% fruit juices, 100% vegetable juices, and dried fruits are all considered as servings of fruits and vegetables. A wide variety of fruits and vegetables provide a range of nutrients and different bioactive compounds including phytochemicals (phenolics, flavonoids, and carotenoids), vitamins (vitamin C, folate, and provitamin A), minerals (potassium, calcium, and magnesium), and fibers. More and more evidence suggests that the health benefits of fruits and vegetables are attributed to the additive and synergistic interactions of the phytochemicals present in whole foods by targeting multiple signal transduction pathways. Therefore, consumers should obtain nutrients and bioactive compounds from a wide variety of whole foods for optimal nutrition and health well-being, not from expensive dietary supplements. SN - 1750-3841 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23789932/Dietary_bioactive_compounds_and_their_health_implications_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1750-3841.12101 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -