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Children's selective attention to pain and avoidance behaviour: the role of child and parental catastrophizing about pain.
Pain. 2013 Oct; 154(10):1979-1988.PAIN

Abstract

The present study investigated selective attention to pain in children, its implications for child avoidance behaviour, and the moderating role of dimensions comprising child and parental catastrophizing about pain (ie, rumination, magnification, and helplessness). Participants were 59 children (31 boys) aged 10-16 years and one of their parents (41 mothers). Children performed a dot-probe task in which child facial pain displays of varying pain expressiveness were presented. Child avoidance behaviour was indexed by child pain tolerance during a cold-pressor task. Children and parents completed measures of child and parent pain catastrophizing, respectively. Findings indicated that both the nature of child selective attention to pain and the impact of selective attention upon child avoidance behaviour were differentially sensitive to specific dimensions of child and parental catastrophizing. Specifically, findings showed greater tendency to shift attention away from pain faces (i.e.,, attentional avoidance) among children reporting greater pain magnification. A similar pattern was observed in terms of parental characteristics, such that children increasingly shifted attention away from pain with increasing levels of parental rumination and helplessness. Furthermore, child attentional avoidance was associated with greater avoidance behaviour (i.e., lower pain tolerance) among children reporting high levels of pain magnification and those whose parents reported greater rumination about pain. The current findings corroborate catastrophizing as a multidimensional construct that may differentially impact outcomes and attest to the importance of assessing both child and parental characteristics in relation to child pain-related attention and avoidance behaviour. Further research directions are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Experimental-Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium Department of Clinical Health Psychology, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23792243

Citation

Vervoort, Tine, et al. "Children's Selective Attention to Pain and Avoidance Behaviour: the Role of Child and Parental Catastrophizing About Pain." Pain, vol. 154, no. 10, 2013, pp. 1979-1988.
Vervoort T, Trost Z, Van Ryckeghem DML. Children's selective attention to pain and avoidance behaviour: the role of child and parental catastrophizing about pain. Pain. 2013;154(10):1979-1988.
Vervoort, T., Trost, Z., & Van Ryckeghem, D. M. L. (2013). Children's selective attention to pain and avoidance behaviour: the role of child and parental catastrophizing about pain. Pain, 154(10), 1979-1988. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2013.05.052
Vervoort T, Trost Z, Van Ryckeghem DML. Children's Selective Attention to Pain and Avoidance Behaviour: the Role of Child and Parental Catastrophizing About Pain. Pain. 2013;154(10):1979-1988. PubMed PMID: 23792243.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Children's selective attention to pain and avoidance behaviour: the role of child and parental catastrophizing about pain. AU - Vervoort,Tine, AU - Trost,Zina, AU - Van Ryckeghem,Dimitri M L, Y1 - 2013/06/18/ PY - 2013/02/15/received PY - 2013/05/22/revised PY - 2013/05/22/accepted PY - 2013/6/25/entrez PY - 2013/6/25/pubmed PY - 2014/5/3/medline KW - Children KW - Pain catastrophizing KW - Pain tolerance KW - Parents KW - Selective attention SP - 1979 EP - 1988 JF - Pain JO - Pain VL - 154 IS - 10 N2 - The present study investigated selective attention to pain in children, its implications for child avoidance behaviour, and the moderating role of dimensions comprising child and parental catastrophizing about pain (ie, rumination, magnification, and helplessness). Participants were 59 children (31 boys) aged 10-16 years and one of their parents (41 mothers). Children performed a dot-probe task in which child facial pain displays of varying pain expressiveness were presented. Child avoidance behaviour was indexed by child pain tolerance during a cold-pressor task. Children and parents completed measures of child and parent pain catastrophizing, respectively. Findings indicated that both the nature of child selective attention to pain and the impact of selective attention upon child avoidance behaviour were differentially sensitive to specific dimensions of child and parental catastrophizing. Specifically, findings showed greater tendency to shift attention away from pain faces (i.e.,, attentional avoidance) among children reporting greater pain magnification. A similar pattern was observed in terms of parental characteristics, such that children increasingly shifted attention away from pain with increasing levels of parental rumination and helplessness. Furthermore, child attentional avoidance was associated with greater avoidance behaviour (i.e., lower pain tolerance) among children reporting high levels of pain magnification and those whose parents reported greater rumination about pain. The current findings corroborate catastrophizing as a multidimensional construct that may differentially impact outcomes and attest to the importance of assessing both child and parental characteristics in relation to child pain-related attention and avoidance behaviour. Further research directions are discussed. SN - 1872-6623 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23792243/Children's_selective_attention_to_pain_and_avoidance_behaviour:_the_role_of_child_and_parental_catastrophizing_about_pain_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/00006396-201310000-00015 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -