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Risk factors for respiratory symptoms in adults: the Busselton Health Study.
Respirology 2013; 18(8):1256-60R

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE

The prevalence of reported doctor-diagnosed 'asthma' increased between 1990 and 2005-2007 in Busselton, Western Australia, accompanied by increased reported cough and phlegm but not recent wheeze. Possible reasons for the increase in diagnosed asthma include environmental exposures and diagnostic transfer. The aim of this study was to relate subject characteristics and exposures to the presence of wheeze and/or current cough/phlegm in the 2005-2007 survey.

METHODS

A gender- and age-stratified random sample of 2862 adults from the Busselton shire completed questionnaires regarding doctor-diagnosed asthma, respiratory symptoms and environmental exposures; and measures of anthropometry, spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and atopy. Associations between respiratory symptoms and subject characteristics were assessed in 2656 subjects.

RESULTS

Wheeze was reported by 23% of subjects, cough/phlegm by 22% and both by 9%. The significant and independent correlates of wheeze were reflux symptoms, lung function, AHR, eNO, atopy, body mass index and smoking. The significant and independent correlates of cough/phlegm were reflux symptoms, lung function, smoking and dusty job. Subjects more likely to report only wheeze than only cough/phlegm were female, aged <40 years, atopic, had lower percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or higher percentage predicted force vital capacity.

CONCLUSIONS

A variety of risk factors was associated with wheeze or cough/phlegm or both. Increased non-allergic exposures may account for increased prevalence of reported cough and phlegm and may contribute to increased reported asthma in adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep Medicine, West Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Busselton Population Medical Research Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23796074

Citation

James, Alan L., et al. "Risk Factors for Respiratory Symptoms in Adults: the Busselton Health Study." Respirology (Carlton, Vic.), vol. 18, no. 8, 2013, pp. 1256-60.
James AL, Knuiman MW, Divitini ML, et al. Risk factors for respiratory symptoms in adults: the Busselton Health Study. Respirology. 2013;18(8):1256-60.
James, A. L., Knuiman, M. W., Divitini, M. L., Hui, J., Hunter, M. L., Mulrennan, S. A., & Musk, A. W. (2013). Risk factors for respiratory symptoms in adults: the Busselton Health Study. Respirology (Carlton, Vic.), 18(8), pp. 1256-60. doi:10.1111/resp.12147.
James AL, et al. Risk Factors for Respiratory Symptoms in Adults: the Busselton Health Study. Respirology. 2013;18(8):1256-60. PubMed PMID: 23796074.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk factors for respiratory symptoms in adults: the Busselton Health Study. AU - James,Alan L, AU - Knuiman,Matthew W, AU - Divitini,Mark L, AU - Hui,Jennie, AU - Hunter,Michael L, AU - Mulrennan,Siobhain A, AU - Musk,A W Bill, PY - 2013/02/02/received PY - 2013/03/12/revised PY - 2013/05/04/revised PY - 2013/05/06/accepted PY - 2013/6/26/entrez PY - 2013/6/26/pubmed PY - 2014/10/1/medline KW - asthma prevalence KW - cough KW - diagnostic transfer KW - phlegm KW - wheeze SP - 1256 EP - 60 JF - Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) JO - Respirology VL - 18 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of reported doctor-diagnosed 'asthma' increased between 1990 and 2005-2007 in Busselton, Western Australia, accompanied by increased reported cough and phlegm but not recent wheeze. Possible reasons for the increase in diagnosed asthma include environmental exposures and diagnostic transfer. The aim of this study was to relate subject characteristics and exposures to the presence of wheeze and/or current cough/phlegm in the 2005-2007 survey. METHODS: A gender- and age-stratified random sample of 2862 adults from the Busselton shire completed questionnaires regarding doctor-diagnosed asthma, respiratory symptoms and environmental exposures; and measures of anthropometry, spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and atopy. Associations between respiratory symptoms and subject characteristics were assessed in 2656 subjects. RESULTS: Wheeze was reported by 23% of subjects, cough/phlegm by 22% and both by 9%. The significant and independent correlates of wheeze were reflux symptoms, lung function, AHR, eNO, atopy, body mass index and smoking. The significant and independent correlates of cough/phlegm were reflux symptoms, lung function, smoking and dusty job. Subjects more likely to report only wheeze than only cough/phlegm were female, aged <40 years, atopic, had lower percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or higher percentage predicted force vital capacity. CONCLUSIONS: A variety of risk factors was associated with wheeze or cough/phlegm or both. Increased non-allergic exposures may account for increased prevalence of reported cough and phlegm and may contribute to increased reported asthma in adults. SN - 1440-1843 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23796074/Risk_factors_for_respiratory_symptoms_in_adults:_the_Busselton_Health_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/resp.12147 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -