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Self-incompatibility in Petunia: a self/nonself-recognition mechanism employing S-locus F-box proteins and S-RNase to prevent inbreeding.
Wiley Interdiscip Rev Dev Biol. 2012 Mar-Apr; 1(2):267-75.WI

Abstract

Many flowering plants producing bisexual flowers have adopted self-incompatibility (SI), a reproductive strategy which allows pistils to distinguish between self and nonself pollen, and to only permit nonself pollen to effect fertilization. To date, three different SI mechanisms have been identified, and this article focuses on the S-RNase-based mechanism using Petunia (Solanaceae) as a model. The genetic basis of this type of SI was established nearly a century ago; the polymorphic S-locus specifies the genetic identity of pollen and the pistil. Molecular genetic studies carried out since the late 1980s have led to the identification of the polymorphic genes at the S-locus that control self/nonself-recognition between pollen and the pistil. The S-RNase gene, which controls pistil specificity, was identified first, and subsequent sequencing of the S-locus region containing S-RNase led to the identification of the S-locus F-box (SLF) gene (now named SLF1). A transgenic approach was used to show that S2-SLF1 (SLF1 of S2-halotype) of Petunia inflata controls pollen specificity. The S-locus contains additional pollen-expressed F-box genes that show sequence similarity with SLF1, and initially they were thought not to be involved in pollen specificity. However, further studies of SLF1 suggested that it is not the only pollen specificity gene. Indeed, it has recently been shown that two previously identified SLF-like genes in P. inflata (now named SLF2 and SLF3) and a yet unknown number of additional SLF-like genes (named SLF4, SLF5, etc.) collaboratively function to control pollen specificity. The significance and implications of this new finding are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Plant Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, PA, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23801440

Citation

Wang, Ning, and Teh-Hui Kao. "Self-incompatibility in Petunia: a Self/nonself-recognition Mechanism Employing S-locus F-box Proteins and S-RNase to Prevent Inbreeding." Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Developmental Biology, vol. 1, no. 2, 2012, pp. 267-75.
Wang N, Kao TH. Self-incompatibility in Petunia: a self/nonself-recognition mechanism employing S-locus F-box proteins and S-RNase to prevent inbreeding. Wiley Interdiscip Rev Dev Biol. 2012;1(2):267-75.
Wang, N., & Kao, T. H. (2012). Self-incompatibility in Petunia: a self/nonself-recognition mechanism employing S-locus F-box proteins and S-RNase to prevent inbreeding. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Developmental Biology, 1(2), 267-75. https://doi.org/10.1002/wdev.10
Wang N, Kao TH. Self-incompatibility in Petunia: a Self/nonself-recognition Mechanism Employing S-locus F-box Proteins and S-RNase to Prevent Inbreeding. Wiley Interdiscip Rev Dev Biol. 2012 Mar-Apr;1(2):267-75. PubMed PMID: 23801440.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-incompatibility in Petunia: a self/nonself-recognition mechanism employing S-locus F-box proteins and S-RNase to prevent inbreeding. AU - Wang,Ning, AU - Kao,Teh-Hui, Y1 - 2011/11/17/ PY - 2013/6/27/entrez PY - 2012/3/1/pubmed PY - 2014/1/16/medline SP - 267 EP - 75 JF - Wiley interdisciplinary reviews. Developmental biology JO - Wiley Interdiscip Rev Dev Biol VL - 1 IS - 2 N2 - Many flowering plants producing bisexual flowers have adopted self-incompatibility (SI), a reproductive strategy which allows pistils to distinguish between self and nonself pollen, and to only permit nonself pollen to effect fertilization. To date, three different SI mechanisms have been identified, and this article focuses on the S-RNase-based mechanism using Petunia (Solanaceae) as a model. The genetic basis of this type of SI was established nearly a century ago; the polymorphic S-locus specifies the genetic identity of pollen and the pistil. Molecular genetic studies carried out since the late 1980s have led to the identification of the polymorphic genes at the S-locus that control self/nonself-recognition between pollen and the pistil. The S-RNase gene, which controls pistil specificity, was identified first, and subsequent sequencing of the S-locus region containing S-RNase led to the identification of the S-locus F-box (SLF) gene (now named SLF1). A transgenic approach was used to show that S2-SLF1 (SLF1 of S2-halotype) of Petunia inflata controls pollen specificity. The S-locus contains additional pollen-expressed F-box genes that show sequence similarity with SLF1, and initially they were thought not to be involved in pollen specificity. However, further studies of SLF1 suggested that it is not the only pollen specificity gene. Indeed, it has recently been shown that two previously identified SLF-like genes in P. inflata (now named SLF2 and SLF3) and a yet unknown number of additional SLF-like genes (named SLF4, SLF5, etc.) collaboratively function to control pollen specificity. The significance and implications of this new finding are discussed. SN - 1759-7692 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23801440/Self_incompatibility_in_Petunia:_a_self/nonself_recognition_mechanism_employing_S_locus_F_box_proteins_and_S_RNase_to_prevent_inbreeding_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/wdev.10 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -