Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Travel-related leptospirosis: a series of 15 imported cases.
J Travel Med. 2013 Jul-Aug; 20(4):228-31.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Leptospirosis belongs to the spectrum of travel-related infections.

METHODS

We retrospectively studied all the consecutive cases of travel-related leptospirosis seen in our department between January 2008 and September 2011. Patients were included with a clinical picture compatible with the disease within 21 days after return, the presence of a thermoresistant antigen or IgM antibodies, Elisa ≥ 1 /400, and a positive microagglutination test (MAT) ≥ 1/100.

RESULTS

Fifteen leptospirosis cases were evaluated. Exposure occurred in Asia (47%), Africa (20%), the Caribbean (20%), and Indian Ocean (13%). Fourteen patients were infected during water-related activities. On admission the most frequent symptoms were fever (100%), headache (80%), and digestive disorders (67%). Relevant laboratory findings included impaired liver function tests (100%), lymphocytopenia (80%), thrombocytopenia (67%), and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) (67%). Our cases were confirmed by MAT that found antibodies against nine different serovars. Seven patients were cured with amoxicillin, four with doxycycline, two with ceftriaxone, one with ceftriaxone, doxycycline, and spiramycin, whereas one recovered spontaneously (retrospective diagnosis). Eight patients were hospitalized. All patients recovered.

CONCLUSION

Our cases involved nine different serovars. They were related to travel in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. Bathing or other fresh-water leisure activities (canoeing, kayaking, rafting) are the most likely at-risk exposure. Any traveler with fever and at-risk exposure should be investigated for leptospirosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Travel Clinic, Clinique Saint-Pierre, Ottignies, Belgium. vandewervecharlotte@yahoo.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23809072

Citation

van de Werve, Charlotte, et al. "Travel-related Leptospirosis: a Series of 15 Imported Cases." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 20, no. 4, 2013, pp. 228-31.
van de Werve C, Perignon A, Jauréguiberry S, et al. Travel-related leptospirosis: a series of 15 imported cases. J Travel Med. 2013;20(4):228-31.
van de Werve, C., Perignon, A., Jauréguiberry, S., Bricaire, F., Bourhy, P., & Caumes, E. (2013). Travel-related leptospirosis: a series of 15 imported cases. Journal of Travel Medicine, 20(4), 228-31. https://doi.org/10.1111/jtm.12035
van de Werve C, et al. Travel-related Leptospirosis: a Series of 15 Imported Cases. J Travel Med. 2013;20(4):228-31. PubMed PMID: 23809072.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Travel-related leptospirosis: a series of 15 imported cases. AU - van de Werve,Charlotte, AU - Perignon,Alice, AU - Jauréguiberry,Stéphane, AU - Bricaire,François, AU - Bourhy,Pascal, AU - Caumes,Eric, Y1 - 2013/05/15/ PY - 2012/07/11/received PY - 2013/01/21/revised PY - 2013/01/23/accepted PY - 2013/7/2/entrez PY - 2013/7/3/pubmed PY - 2014/3/13/medline SP - 228 EP - 31 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 20 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Leptospirosis belongs to the spectrum of travel-related infections. METHODS: We retrospectively studied all the consecutive cases of travel-related leptospirosis seen in our department between January 2008 and September 2011. Patients were included with a clinical picture compatible with the disease within 21 days after return, the presence of a thermoresistant antigen or IgM antibodies, Elisa ≥ 1 /400, and a positive microagglutination test (MAT) ≥ 1/100. RESULTS: Fifteen leptospirosis cases were evaluated. Exposure occurred in Asia (47%), Africa (20%), the Caribbean (20%), and Indian Ocean (13%). Fourteen patients were infected during water-related activities. On admission the most frequent symptoms were fever (100%), headache (80%), and digestive disorders (67%). Relevant laboratory findings included impaired liver function tests (100%), lymphocytopenia (80%), thrombocytopenia (67%), and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) (67%). Our cases were confirmed by MAT that found antibodies against nine different serovars. Seven patients were cured with amoxicillin, four with doxycycline, two with ceftriaxone, one with ceftriaxone, doxycycline, and spiramycin, whereas one recovered spontaneously (retrospective diagnosis). Eight patients were hospitalized. All patients recovered. CONCLUSION: Our cases involved nine different serovars. They were related to travel in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. Bathing or other fresh-water leisure activities (canoeing, kayaking, rafting) are the most likely at-risk exposure. Any traveler with fever and at-risk exposure should be investigated for leptospirosis. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23809072/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/jtm.12035 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -