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Fetuses respond to father's voice but prefer mother's voice after birth.
Dev Psychobiol. 2014 Jan; 56(1):1-11.DP

Abstract

Fetal and newborn responding to audio-recordings of their father's versus mother's reading a story were examined. At home, fathers read a different story to the fetus each day for 7 days. Subsequently, in the laboratory, continuous fetal heart rate was recorded during a 9 min protocol, including three, 3 min periods: baseline no-sound, voice (mother or father), postvoice no-sound. Following a 20 min delay, the opposite voice was delivered. Newborn head-turning was observed on 20 s trials: three no-sound, three voice (mother or father), three opposite voice, three no-sound trials with the same segment of each parent's recording. Fetuses showed a heart rate increase to both voices which was sustained over the voice period. Consistent with prior reports, newborns showed a preference for their mother's but not their father's voice. The characteristics of voice stimuli that capture fetal attention and elicit a response are yet to be identified.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23817883

Citation

Lee, Grace Y., and Barbara S. Kisilevsky. "Fetuses Respond to Father's Voice but Prefer Mother's Voice After Birth." Developmental Psychobiology, vol. 56, no. 1, 2014, pp. 1-11.
Lee GY, Kisilevsky BS. Fetuses respond to father's voice but prefer mother's voice after birth. Dev Psychobiol. 2014;56(1):1-11.
Lee, G. Y., & Kisilevsky, B. S. (2014). Fetuses respond to father's voice but prefer mother's voice after birth. Developmental Psychobiology, 56(1), 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1002/dev.21084
Lee GY, Kisilevsky BS. Fetuses Respond to Father's Voice but Prefer Mother's Voice After Birth. Dev Psychobiol. 2014;56(1):1-11. PubMed PMID: 23817883.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fetuses respond to father's voice but prefer mother's voice after birth. AU - Lee,Grace Y, AU - Kisilevsky,Barbara S, Y1 - 2013/07/02/ PY - 2012/03/25/received PY - 2012/09/25/accepted PY - 2013/7/3/entrez PY - 2013/7/3/pubmed PY - 2014/8/12/medline KW - father's voice KW - fetus KW - head-turning KW - heart rate KW - mother's voice KW - newborn KW - perception SP - 1 EP - 11 JF - Developmental psychobiology JO - Dev Psychobiol VL - 56 IS - 1 N2 - Fetal and newborn responding to audio-recordings of their father's versus mother's reading a story were examined. At home, fathers read a different story to the fetus each day for 7 days. Subsequently, in the laboratory, continuous fetal heart rate was recorded during a 9 min protocol, including three, 3 min periods: baseline no-sound, voice (mother or father), postvoice no-sound. Following a 20 min delay, the opposite voice was delivered. Newborn head-turning was observed on 20 s trials: three no-sound, three voice (mother or father), three opposite voice, three no-sound trials with the same segment of each parent's recording. Fetuses showed a heart rate increase to both voices which was sustained over the voice period. Consistent with prior reports, newborns showed a preference for their mother's but not their father's voice. The characteristics of voice stimuli that capture fetal attention and elicit a response are yet to be identified. SN - 1098-2302 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23817883/Fetuses_respond_to_father's_voice_but_prefer_mother's_voice_after_birth_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/dev.21084 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -