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[Diagnosis of intestinal oxalate hyperabsorption in patients with idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate urinary calculi].
Urologe A. 1990 May; 29(3):148-51.U

Abstract

By oral administration of 14C-labelled oxalic acid (2.2 microns Ci; 2 mg), the mean enteral oxalate absorption in 24-h urines (collecting intervals 3, 3, 6, 12 h) of 19 healthy control subjects was determined to be 8.3%. It was 14.6% (alpha less than 1%) in 20 patients with recurrent idiopathic calcium-oxalate lithiasis. The differences in absorption were most marked in the first two 3-h urines. Under the test conditions described, maximum excretion of 14C oxalate had already occurred after 3 h (55%-57%); after 6 h it was about 85%, and after 12 h 95% of the total activity in the 24-h urine. In 68% of the control subjects, the oxalate absorption values were below 10%; in 32% they were less than or equal to 15%. For the group of lithiasis patients, these findings suggest a metabolic disorder of gastrointestinal origin. In 40%, the oxalate absorption rates were clearly above 15%. The test method described is simple to carry out and can be recommended for the assessment of idiopathic calcium-oxalate lithiasis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Klinik und Poliklinik für Urologie, Bereich Medizin der Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, DDR.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

ger

PubMed ID

2382323

Citation

Berg, W, et al. "[Diagnosis of Intestinal Oxalate Hyperabsorption in Patients With Idiopathic Recurrent Calcium Oxalate Urinary Calculi]." Der Urologe. Ausg. A, vol. 29, no. 3, 1990, pp. 148-51.
Berg W, Haerting R, Bothor C, et al. [Diagnosis of intestinal oxalate hyperabsorption in patients with idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate urinary calculi]. Urologe A. 1990;29(3):148-51.
Berg, W., Haerting, R., Bothor, C., Meinig, S., Eschholz, A., & Schulze, H. P. (1990). [Diagnosis of intestinal oxalate hyperabsorption in patients with idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate urinary calculi]. Der Urologe. Ausg. A, 29(3), 148-51.
Berg W, et al. [Diagnosis of Intestinal Oxalate Hyperabsorption in Patients With Idiopathic Recurrent Calcium Oxalate Urinary Calculi]. Urologe A. 1990;29(3):148-51. PubMed PMID: 2382323.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Diagnosis of intestinal oxalate hyperabsorption in patients with idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate urinary calculi]. AU - Berg,W, AU - Haerting,R, AU - Bothor,C, AU - Meinig,S, AU - Eschholz,A, AU - Schulze,H P, PY - 1990/5/1/pubmed PY - 1990/5/1/medline PY - 1990/5/1/entrez SP - 148 EP - 51 JF - Der Urologe. Ausg. A JO - Urologe A VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - By oral administration of 14C-labelled oxalic acid (2.2 microns Ci; 2 mg), the mean enteral oxalate absorption in 24-h urines (collecting intervals 3, 3, 6, 12 h) of 19 healthy control subjects was determined to be 8.3%. It was 14.6% (alpha less than 1%) in 20 patients with recurrent idiopathic calcium-oxalate lithiasis. The differences in absorption were most marked in the first two 3-h urines. Under the test conditions described, maximum excretion of 14C oxalate had already occurred after 3 h (55%-57%); after 6 h it was about 85%, and after 12 h 95% of the total activity in the 24-h urine. In 68% of the control subjects, the oxalate absorption values were below 10%; in 32% they were less than or equal to 15%. For the group of lithiasis patients, these findings suggest a metabolic disorder of gastrointestinal origin. In 40%, the oxalate absorption rates were clearly above 15%. The test method described is simple to carry out and can be recommended for the assessment of idiopathic calcium-oxalate lithiasis. SN - 0340-2592 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2382323/[Diagnosis_of_intestinal_oxalate_hyperabsorption_in_patients_with_idiopathic_recurrent_calcium_oxalate_urinary_calculi]_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -