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Distinct neural circuits underlie assessment of a diversity of natural dangers by American crows.
Proc Biol Sci 2013; 280(1765):20131046PB

Abstract

Social animals encountering natural dangers face decisions such as whether to freeze, flee or harass the threat. The American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos, conspicuously mobs dangers. We used positron emission tomography to test the hypothesis that distinct neuronal substrates underlie the crow's consistent behavioural response to different dangers. We found that crows activated brain regions associated with attention and arousal (nucleus isthmo-opticus/locus coeruleus), and with motor response (arcopallium), as they fixed their gaze on a threat. However, despite this consistent behavioural and neural response, the sight of a person who previously captured the crow, a person holding a dead crow and a taxidermy-mounted hawk activated distinct forebrain regions (amygdala, hippocampus and portion of the caudal nidopallium, respectively). We suggest that aspects of mobbing behaviour are guided by unique neural circuits that respond to differences in mental processing-learning, memory formation and multisensory discrimination-required to appropriately nuance a risky behaviour to specific dangers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23825209

Citation

Cross, Donna J., et al. "Distinct Neural Circuits Underlie Assessment of a Diversity of Natural Dangers By American Crows." Proceedings. Biological Sciences, vol. 280, no. 1765, 2013, p. 20131046.
Cross DJ, Marzluff JM, Palmquist I, et al. Distinct neural circuits underlie assessment of a diversity of natural dangers by American crows. Proc Biol Sci. 2013;280(1765):20131046.
Cross, D. J., Marzluff, J. M., Palmquist, I., Minoshima, S., Shimizu, T., & Miyaoka, R. (2013). Distinct neural circuits underlie assessment of a diversity of natural dangers by American crows. Proceedings. Biological Sciences, 280(1765), p. 20131046. doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.1046.
Cross DJ, et al. Distinct Neural Circuits Underlie Assessment of a Diversity of Natural Dangers By American Crows. Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Aug 22;280(1765):20131046. PubMed PMID: 23825209.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Distinct neural circuits underlie assessment of a diversity of natural dangers by American crows. AU - Cross,Donna J, AU - Marzluff,John M, AU - Palmquist,Ila, AU - Minoshima,Satoshi, AU - Shimizu,Toru, AU - Miyaoka,Robert, Y1 - 2013/07/03/ PY - 2013/7/5/entrez PY - 2013/7/5/pubmed PY - 2014/3/4/medline KW - fear KW - memory KW - whole brain image SP - 20131046 EP - 20131046 JF - Proceedings. Biological sciences JO - Proc. Biol. Sci. VL - 280 IS - 1765 N2 - Social animals encountering natural dangers face decisions such as whether to freeze, flee or harass the threat. The American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos, conspicuously mobs dangers. We used positron emission tomography to test the hypothesis that distinct neuronal substrates underlie the crow's consistent behavioural response to different dangers. We found that crows activated brain regions associated with attention and arousal (nucleus isthmo-opticus/locus coeruleus), and with motor response (arcopallium), as they fixed their gaze on a threat. However, despite this consistent behavioural and neural response, the sight of a person who previously captured the crow, a person holding a dead crow and a taxidermy-mounted hawk activated distinct forebrain regions (amygdala, hippocampus and portion of the caudal nidopallium, respectively). We suggest that aspects of mobbing behaviour are guided by unique neural circuits that respond to differences in mental processing-learning, memory formation and multisensory discrimination-required to appropriately nuance a risky behaviour to specific dangers. SN - 1471-2954 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23825209/Distinct_neural_circuits_underlie_assessment_of_a_diversity_of_natural_dangers_by_American_crows_ L2 - https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rspb.2013.1046?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -