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Cooked rice prevents hyperlipidemia in hamsters fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet by the regulation of the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism.
Nutr Res. 2013 Jul; 33(7):572-9.NR

Abstract

Rice has many health-beneficial components for ameliorating obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. However, the effect of cooked rice as a useful carbohydrate source has not been investigated yet; so we hypothesized that cooked rice may have hypolipidemic effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cooked rice on hyperlipidemia and on the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism. Golden Syrian hamsters were divided into 2 groups and fed a high-fat (15%, wt/wt)/cholesterol (0.5%, wt/wt) diet supplemented with either corn starch (HFD, 54.5% wt/wt) or cooked rice (HFD-CR, 54.5% wt/wt) as the main carbohydrate source for 8 weeks. In the HFD-CR group, the triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in the serum and liver were decreased, and the total lipid, total cholesterol, and bile acid levels in the feces were increased, compared with the HFD group. In the cooked-rice group, the messenger RNA and protein levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase were significantly downregulated; and the messenger RNA and protein levels of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase were upregulated. Furthermore, the expressions of lipogenic genes such as sterol response element binding protein-1, fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase, and stearoyl CoA desaturase-1 were downregulated, whereas the β-oxidation related genes (carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, acyl CoA oxidase, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α) were upregulated, in the cooked-rice group. Our results suggest that the hypolipidemic effect of cooked rice is partially mediated by the regulation of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, which results in the suppression of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis and the enhancement of cholesterol excretion and fatty acid β-oxidation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Metabolism and Functionality Research, Korea Food Research Institute, 516, Baekhyun-Dong, Bundang-Gu, Sungnam 463-746, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23827132

Citation

Choi, Won Hee, et al. "Cooked Rice Prevents Hyperlipidemia in Hamsters Fed a High-fat/cholesterol Diet By the Regulation of the Expression of Hepatic Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 33, no. 7, 2013, pp. 572-9.
Choi WH, Gwon SY, Ahn J, et al. Cooked rice prevents hyperlipidemia in hamsters fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet by the regulation of the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism. Nutr Res. 2013;33(7):572-9.
Choi, W. H., Gwon, S. Y., Ahn, J., Jung, C. H., & Ha, T. Y. (2013). Cooked rice prevents hyperlipidemia in hamsters fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet by the regulation of the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 33(7), 572-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2013.04.006
Choi WH, et al. Cooked Rice Prevents Hyperlipidemia in Hamsters Fed a High-fat/cholesterol Diet By the Regulation of the Expression of Hepatic Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism. Nutr Res. 2013;33(7):572-9. PubMed PMID: 23827132.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cooked rice prevents hyperlipidemia in hamsters fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet by the regulation of the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism. AU - Choi,Won Hee, AU - Gwon,So Young, AU - Ahn,Jiyun, AU - Jung,Chang Hwa, AU - Ha,Tae Youl, Y1 - 2013/05/21/ PY - 2012/09/20/received PY - 2013/04/08/revised PY - 2013/04/10/accepted PY - 2013/7/6/entrez PY - 2013/7/6/pubmed PY - 2014/1/22/medline KW - 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase KW - ACC1 KW - ACOX KW - CPT-1 KW - CYP7A1 KW - Cooked rice KW - FAS KW - HFD KW - HFD-CR KW - HMG-CoAR KW - Hamster KW - Hyperlipidemia KW - LDLR KW - Lipogenic KW - PPARα KW - SCD-1 KW - SREBP-1c KW - acetyl CoA carboxylase KW - acyl CoA oxidase KW - carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 KW - cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase KW - fatty acid synthase KW - high fat diet supplemented with cooked rice KW - high-fat diet KW - low-density lipoprotein receptor KW - peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α KW - stearoyl CoA desaturase-1 KW - sterol response element binding protein-1 KW - β-Oxidation SP - 572 EP - 9 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 33 IS - 7 N2 - Rice has many health-beneficial components for ameliorating obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. However, the effect of cooked rice as a useful carbohydrate source has not been investigated yet; so we hypothesized that cooked rice may have hypolipidemic effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cooked rice on hyperlipidemia and on the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism. Golden Syrian hamsters were divided into 2 groups and fed a high-fat (15%, wt/wt)/cholesterol (0.5%, wt/wt) diet supplemented with either corn starch (HFD, 54.5% wt/wt) or cooked rice (HFD-CR, 54.5% wt/wt) as the main carbohydrate source for 8 weeks. In the HFD-CR group, the triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in the serum and liver were decreased, and the total lipid, total cholesterol, and bile acid levels in the feces were increased, compared with the HFD group. In the cooked-rice group, the messenger RNA and protein levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase were significantly downregulated; and the messenger RNA and protein levels of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase were upregulated. Furthermore, the expressions of lipogenic genes such as sterol response element binding protein-1, fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase, and stearoyl CoA desaturase-1 were downregulated, whereas the β-oxidation related genes (carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, acyl CoA oxidase, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α) were upregulated, in the cooked-rice group. Our results suggest that the hypolipidemic effect of cooked rice is partially mediated by the regulation of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, which results in the suppression of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis and the enhancement of cholesterol excretion and fatty acid β-oxidation. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23827132/Cooked_rice_prevents_hyperlipidemia_in_hamsters_fed_a_high_fat/cholesterol_diet_by_the_regulation_of_the_expression_of_hepatic_genes_involved_in_lipid_metabolism_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(13)00080-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -