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Improved anti-inflammatory effects in rabbit eye model using biodegradable poly beta-amino ester nanoparticles of triamcinolone acetonide.
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Aug 15; 54(8):5520-6.IO

Abstract

PURPOSE

Results of previous studies on the benefits of ocular drug delivery using polymeric mucoadhesive nanoparticles suggested longer presence and better penetration of nanoparticles, and, thus, increased effect and bioavailability of drugs entrapped in nanoparticles. In this study, a novel polymer, poly β-amino ester, was used for the preparation of triamcinolone acetonide-loaded nanoparticles using a modified emulsification/solvent diffusion method.

METHODS

Mucoadhesiveness studies, in vitro drug release, x-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy were used for physicochemical characterization of nanoparticles. Thirty-six hours after inducing uveitis by intravitreal injection of a lipopolysaccharide, sampling from the aqueous humor was done and inflammatory factors, such as cell, protein, nitric oxide, and prostaglandin E2, were compared.

RESULTS

Nanoparticles with a mean size of 178 nm and drug loading of 5.3% were prepared and used for in vivo studies in rabbits with uveitis. Higher anti-inflammatory effect was observed for polymeric nanoparticles of triamcinolone acetonide compared with microparticles of prednisolone acetate and triamcinolone acetonide, and an equal effect compared with subconjunctival injection of triamcinolone acetonide in terms of inhibiting inflammation and inflammatory mediators.

CONCLUSIONS

It can be concluded that polymeric nanoparticles of triamcinolone acetonide will provide as good an anti-inflammatory effect as the subconjunctival injection method and are better compared with other drug delivery systems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23833065

Citation

Sabzevari, Araz, et al. "Improved Anti-inflammatory Effects in Rabbit Eye Model Using Biodegradable Poly Beta-amino Ester Nanoparticles of Triamcinolone Acetonide." Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 54, no. 8, 2013, pp. 5520-6.
Sabzevari A, Adibkia K, Hashemi H, et al. Improved anti-inflammatory effects in rabbit eye model using biodegradable poly beta-amino ester nanoparticles of triamcinolone acetonide. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013;54(8):5520-6.
Sabzevari, A., Adibkia, K., Hashemi, H., De Geest, B. G., Mohsenzadeh, N., Atyabi, F., Ghahremani, M. H., Khoshayand, M. R., & Dinarvand, R. (2013). Improved anti-inflammatory effects in rabbit eye model using biodegradable poly beta-amino ester nanoparticles of triamcinolone acetonide. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 54(8), 5520-6. https://doi.org/10.1167/iovs.13-12296
Sabzevari A, et al. Improved Anti-inflammatory Effects in Rabbit Eye Model Using Biodegradable Poly Beta-amino Ester Nanoparticles of Triamcinolone Acetonide. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Aug 15;54(8):5520-6. PubMed PMID: 23833065.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Improved anti-inflammatory effects in rabbit eye model using biodegradable poly beta-amino ester nanoparticles of triamcinolone acetonide. AU - Sabzevari,Araz, AU - Adibkia,Khosro, AU - Hashemi,Hassan, AU - De Geest,Bruno G, AU - Mohsenzadeh,Navid, AU - Atyabi,Fatemeh, AU - Ghahremani,Mohammad Hossein, AU - Khoshayand,Mohammad-Reza, AU - Dinarvand,Rassoul, Y1 - 2013/08/15/ PY - 2013/7/9/entrez PY - 2013/7/9/pubmed PY - 2013/11/8/medline KW - mucoadhesive KW - nanoparticles KW - nitric oxide KW - ocular drug delivery KW - poly beta-amino ester KW - triamcinolone acetonide KW - uveitis SP - 5520 EP - 6 JF - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science JO - Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. VL - 54 IS - 8 N2 - PURPOSE: Results of previous studies on the benefits of ocular drug delivery using polymeric mucoadhesive nanoparticles suggested longer presence and better penetration of nanoparticles, and, thus, increased effect and bioavailability of drugs entrapped in nanoparticles. In this study, a novel polymer, poly β-amino ester, was used for the preparation of triamcinolone acetonide-loaded nanoparticles using a modified emulsification/solvent diffusion method. METHODS: Mucoadhesiveness studies, in vitro drug release, x-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy were used for physicochemical characterization of nanoparticles. Thirty-six hours after inducing uveitis by intravitreal injection of a lipopolysaccharide, sampling from the aqueous humor was done and inflammatory factors, such as cell, protein, nitric oxide, and prostaglandin E2, were compared. RESULTS: Nanoparticles with a mean size of 178 nm and drug loading of 5.3% were prepared and used for in vivo studies in rabbits with uveitis. Higher anti-inflammatory effect was observed for polymeric nanoparticles of triamcinolone acetonide compared with microparticles of prednisolone acetate and triamcinolone acetonide, and an equal effect compared with subconjunctival injection of triamcinolone acetonide in terms of inhibiting inflammation and inflammatory mediators. CONCLUSIONS: It can be concluded that polymeric nanoparticles of triamcinolone acetonide will provide as good an anti-inflammatory effect as the subconjunctival injection method and are better compared with other drug delivery systems. SN - 1552-5783 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23833065/Improved_anti_inflammatory_effects_in_rabbit_eye_model_using_biodegradable_poly_beta_amino_ester_nanoparticles_of_triamcinolone_acetonide_ L2 - http://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1167/iovs.13-12296 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -