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The nocebo effect: patient expectations and medication side effects.
Postgrad Med J 2013; 89(1055):540-6PM

Abstract

Expectation of treatment side effects is consistently linked with those symptoms being realised. Patient expectations, including those generated by the informed consent process, can have a large influence on the side effects that patients feel after starting a new medical treatment. Such symptoms may be the result of the nocebo effect, whereby the expectation of side effects leads to them being experienced. Side effects may also be due to the misattribution of pre-existing or unrelated symptoms to the new medication. Medical professionals' own negative beliefs about a treatment, especially generic drugs, may further enhance patients' expectations of adverse effects. The news media may also influence expectations, particularly when media attention is directed towards a health or medication scare. This field of research has ethical and clinical implications for both medical professionals and the news media with respect to the level and type of information about treatment side effects that is provided to patients or members of the public.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23842213

Citation

Faasse, Kate, and Keith J. Petrie. "The Nocebo Effect: Patient Expectations and Medication Side Effects." Postgraduate Medical Journal, vol. 89, no. 1055, 2013, pp. 540-6.
Faasse K, Petrie KJ. The nocebo effect: patient expectations and medication side effects. Postgrad Med J. 2013;89(1055):540-6.
Faasse, K., & Petrie, K. J. (2013). The nocebo effect: patient expectations and medication side effects. Postgraduate Medical Journal, 89(1055), pp. 540-6. doi:10.1136/postgradmedj-2012-131730.
Faasse K, Petrie KJ. The Nocebo Effect: Patient Expectations and Medication Side Effects. Postgrad Med J. 2013;89(1055):540-6. PubMed PMID: 23842213.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The nocebo effect: patient expectations and medication side effects. AU - Faasse,Kate, AU - Petrie,Keith J, Y1 - 2013/07/10/ PY - 2013/7/12/entrez PY - 2013/7/12/pubmed PY - 2014/6/6/medline SP - 540 EP - 6 JF - Postgraduate medical journal JO - Postgrad Med J VL - 89 IS - 1055 N2 - Expectation of treatment side effects is consistently linked with those symptoms being realised. Patient expectations, including those generated by the informed consent process, can have a large influence on the side effects that patients feel after starting a new medical treatment. Such symptoms may be the result of the nocebo effect, whereby the expectation of side effects leads to them being experienced. Side effects may also be due to the misattribution of pre-existing or unrelated symptoms to the new medication. Medical professionals' own negative beliefs about a treatment, especially generic drugs, may further enhance patients' expectations of adverse effects. The news media may also influence expectations, particularly when media attention is directed towards a health or medication scare. This field of research has ethical and clinical implications for both medical professionals and the news media with respect to the level and type of information about treatment side effects that is provided to patients or members of the public. SN - 1469-0756 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23842213/The_nocebo_effect:_patient_expectations_and_medication_side_effects_ L2 - http://pmj.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=23842213 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -