Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, impaired pancreatic β-cell function, and risk of pancreatic cancer.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Obesity and diabetes mellitus are associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. These associations may be secondary to consequences of peripheral insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, or hyperglycemia itself. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a measure of hyperglycemia, whereas plasma insulin and proinsulin are markers of peripheral insulin resistance, and the proinsulin to insulin ratio marks pancreatic β-cell dysfunction.

METHODS

This was a prospective, nested case-control study of 449 case patients and 982 control subjects with prediagnostic blood samples and no diabetes history from five prospective US cohorts followed through 2008. Two or three control subjects were matched to each case patient by year of birth, cohort, smoking, and fasting status. Pancreatic cancer risk was assessed by prediagnostic HbA1c, insulin, proinsulin, and proinsulin to insulin ratio with multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. All P values were two-sided.

RESULTS

The highest vs lowest quintiles of HbA1c, insulin, and proinsulin were associated with with an increased risk for pancreatic cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.17 to 2.72, P trend = .04 for HbA1c; OR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.08 to 2.30; Ptrend = .002 for insulin; and OR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.50 to 3.29; P trend < .001 for proinsulin). Proinsulin to insulin ratio was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Results were similar across studies (all P heterogeneity > .29). In cancers developing 10 or more years after blood collection, the associations with insulin and proinsulin became stronger (highest vs lowest quintile, OR = 2.77; 95% CI = 1.28 to 5.99 for insulin and OR = 3.60; 95% CI = 1.68 to 7.72 for proinsulin). In mutually adjusted models including HbA1c, insulin, and proinsulin, only proinsulin remained statistically significant ( highest vs lowest quintile, OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.54 to 4.21; Ptrend < .001).

CONCLUSIONS

Among participants from five large prospective cohorts, circulating markers of peripheral insulin resistance, rather than hyperglycemia or pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, were independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. bwolpin@partners.org

    , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    Journal of the National Cancer Institute 105:14 2013 Jul 17 pg 1027-35

    MeSH

    Adenocarcinoma
    Adult
    Aged
    Biomarkers
    Blood Glucose
    Case-Control Studies
    Female
    Glycated Hemoglobin A
    Humans
    Hyperglycemia
    Insulin
    Insulin Resistance
    Insulin-Secreting Cells
    Logistic Models
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Odds Ratio
    Pancreatic Neoplasms
    Proinsulin
    Prospective Studies

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23847240

    Citation

    Wolpin, Brian M., et al. "Hyperglycemia, Insulin Resistance, Impaired Pancreatic Β-cell Function, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 105, no. 14, 2013, pp. 1027-35.
    Wolpin BM, Bao Y, Qian ZR, et al. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, impaired pancreatic β-cell function, and risk of pancreatic cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2013;105(14):1027-35.
    Wolpin, B. M., Bao, Y., Qian, Z. R., Wu, C., Kraft, P., Ogino, S., ... Fuchs, C. S. (2013). Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, impaired pancreatic β-cell function, and risk of pancreatic cancer. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 105(14), pp. 1027-35. doi:10.1093/jnci/djt123.
    Wolpin BM, et al. Hyperglycemia, Insulin Resistance, Impaired Pancreatic Β-cell Function, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2013 Jul 17;105(14):1027-35. PubMed PMID: 23847240.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, impaired pancreatic β-cell function, and risk of pancreatic cancer. AU - Wolpin,Brian M, AU - Bao,Ying, AU - Qian,Zhi Rong, AU - Wu,Chen, AU - Kraft,Peter, AU - Ogino,Shuji, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Sato,Kaori, AU - Ma,Jing, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Sesso,Howard D, AU - Lee,I-Min, AU - Gaziano,John Michael, AU - McTiernan,Anne, AU - Phillips,Lawrence S, AU - Cochrane,Barbara B, AU - Pollak,Michael N, AU - Manson,JoAnn E, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, AU - Fuchs,Charles S, Y1 - 2013/07/11/ PY - 2013/7/13/entrez PY - 2013/7/13/pubmed PY - 2013/9/26/medline SP - 1027 EP - 35 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 105 IS - 14 N2 - BACKGROUND: Obesity and diabetes mellitus are associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. These associations may be secondary to consequences of peripheral insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, or hyperglycemia itself. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a measure of hyperglycemia, whereas plasma insulin and proinsulin are markers of peripheral insulin resistance, and the proinsulin to insulin ratio marks pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. METHODS: This was a prospective, nested case-control study of 449 case patients and 982 control subjects with prediagnostic blood samples and no diabetes history from five prospective US cohorts followed through 2008. Two or three control subjects were matched to each case patient by year of birth, cohort, smoking, and fasting status. Pancreatic cancer risk was assessed by prediagnostic HbA1c, insulin, proinsulin, and proinsulin to insulin ratio with multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. All P values were two-sided. RESULTS: The highest vs lowest quintiles of HbA1c, insulin, and proinsulin were associated with with an increased risk for pancreatic cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.17 to 2.72, P trend = .04 for HbA1c; OR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.08 to 2.30; Ptrend = .002 for insulin; and OR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.50 to 3.29; P trend < .001 for proinsulin). Proinsulin to insulin ratio was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Results were similar across studies (all P heterogeneity > .29). In cancers developing 10 or more years after blood collection, the associations with insulin and proinsulin became stronger (highest vs lowest quintile, OR = 2.77; 95% CI = 1.28 to 5.99 for insulin and OR = 3.60; 95% CI = 1.68 to 7.72 for proinsulin). In mutually adjusted models including HbA1c, insulin, and proinsulin, only proinsulin remained statistically significant ( highest vs lowest quintile, OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.54 to 4.21; Ptrend < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Among participants from five large prospective cohorts, circulating markers of peripheral insulin resistance, rather than hyperglycemia or pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, were independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23847240/Hyperglycemia_insulin_resistance_impaired_pancreatic_β_cell_function_and_risk_of_pancreatic_cancer_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djt123 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -