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Acute appearance of fatty acids in human plasma--a comparative study between polar-lipid rich oil from the microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata and krill oil in healthy young males.
Lipids Health Dis. 2013 Jul 15; 12:102.LH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The long-chain n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have human health benefits. Alternatives to fish as sources of EPA and DHA are needed. Oil from the micro-algae Nannochloropsis oculata contains a significant amount of EPA conjugated to phospholipids and glycolipids and no DHA. Krill oil contains EPA and DHA conjugated to phospholipids. We compare the appearance of fatty acids in blood plasma of healthy humans after consuming a high fat meal followed by either algal oil or krill oil.

METHODS

Ten healthy males aged 18-45 years consumed a standard high fat (55 g) breakfast followed by either algal oil (providing 1.5 g EPA and no DHA) or krill oil (providing 1.02 g EPA and 0.54 g DHA). All participants consumed both oils in random order and separated by 7 days. Blood samples were collected before the breakfast and at several time points up to 10 hours after taking the oils. Fatty acid concentrations (μg/ml) in plasma were determined by gas chromatography.

RESULTS

Fatty acids derived mainly from the breakfast appeared rapidly in plasma, peaking about 3 hours after consuming the breakfast, and in a pattern that reflected their content in the breakfast. There were time-dependent increases in the concentrations of both EPA and DHA with both algal oil (P < 0.001 for EPA; P = 0.027 for DHA) and krill oil (P < 0.001 for both EPA and DHA). The concentration of EPA was higher with algal oil than with krill oil at several time points. DHA concentration did not differ between oils at any time point. The maximum concentration of EPA was higher with algal oil (P = 0.010) and both the area under the concentration curve (AUC) and the incremental AUC for EPA were greater with algal oil (P = 0.020 and 0.006). There was no difference between oils in the AUC or the incremental AUC for DHA.

CONCLUSION

This study in healthy young men given a single dose of oil indicates that the polar-lipid rich oil from the algae Nannochloropis oculata is a good source of EPA in humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Qualitas Health Ltd., Jerusalem, Israel. mkagan@qualitas-health.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23855409

Citation

Kagan, Michael L., et al. "Acute Appearance of Fatty Acids in Human Plasma--a Comparative Study Between Polar-lipid Rich Oil From the Microalgae Nannochloropsis Oculata and Krill Oil in Healthy Young Males." Lipids in Health and Disease, vol. 12, 2013, p. 102.
Kagan ML, West AL, Zante C, et al. Acute appearance of fatty acids in human plasma--a comparative study between polar-lipid rich oil from the microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata and krill oil in healthy young males. Lipids Health Dis. 2013;12:102.
Kagan, M. L., West, A. L., Zante, C., & Calder, P. C. (2013). Acute appearance of fatty acids in human plasma--a comparative study between polar-lipid rich oil from the microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata and krill oil in healthy young males. Lipids in Health and Disease, 12, 102. https://doi.org/10.1186/1476-511X-12-102
Kagan ML, et al. Acute Appearance of Fatty Acids in Human Plasma--a Comparative Study Between Polar-lipid Rich Oil From the Microalgae Nannochloropsis Oculata and Krill Oil in Healthy Young Males. Lipids Health Dis. 2013 Jul 15;12:102. PubMed PMID: 23855409.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute appearance of fatty acids in human plasma--a comparative study between polar-lipid rich oil from the microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata and krill oil in healthy young males. AU - Kagan,Michael L, AU - West,Annette L, AU - Zante,Christa, AU - Calder,Philip C, Y1 - 2013/07/15/ PY - 2013/06/26/received PY - 2013/07/11/accepted PY - 2013/7/17/entrez PY - 2013/7/17/pubmed PY - 2014/1/1/medline SP - 102 EP - 102 JF - Lipids in health and disease JO - Lipids Health Dis VL - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: The long-chain n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have human health benefits. Alternatives to fish as sources of EPA and DHA are needed. Oil from the micro-algae Nannochloropsis oculata contains a significant amount of EPA conjugated to phospholipids and glycolipids and no DHA. Krill oil contains EPA and DHA conjugated to phospholipids. We compare the appearance of fatty acids in blood plasma of healthy humans after consuming a high fat meal followed by either algal oil or krill oil. METHODS: Ten healthy males aged 18-45 years consumed a standard high fat (55 g) breakfast followed by either algal oil (providing 1.5 g EPA and no DHA) or krill oil (providing 1.02 g EPA and 0.54 g DHA). All participants consumed both oils in random order and separated by 7 days. Blood samples were collected before the breakfast and at several time points up to 10 hours after taking the oils. Fatty acid concentrations (μg/ml) in plasma were determined by gas chromatography. RESULTS: Fatty acids derived mainly from the breakfast appeared rapidly in plasma, peaking about 3 hours after consuming the breakfast, and in a pattern that reflected their content in the breakfast. There were time-dependent increases in the concentrations of both EPA and DHA with both algal oil (P < 0.001 for EPA; P = 0.027 for DHA) and krill oil (P < 0.001 for both EPA and DHA). The concentration of EPA was higher with algal oil than with krill oil at several time points. DHA concentration did not differ between oils at any time point. The maximum concentration of EPA was higher with algal oil (P = 0.010) and both the area under the concentration curve (AUC) and the incremental AUC for EPA were greater with algal oil (P = 0.020 and 0.006). There was no difference between oils in the AUC or the incremental AUC for DHA. CONCLUSION: This study in healthy young men given a single dose of oil indicates that the polar-lipid rich oil from the algae Nannochloropis oculata is a good source of EPA in humans. SN - 1476-511X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23855409/Acute_appearance_of_fatty_acids_in_human_plasma__a_comparative_study_between_polar_lipid_rich_oil_from_the_microalgae_Nannochloropsis_oculata_and_krill_oil_in_healthy_young_males_ L2 - https://lipidworld.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1476-511X-12-102 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -