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Affective temperaments are associated with specific clusters of symptoms and psychopathology: a cross-sectional study on bipolar disorder inpatients in acute manic, mixed, or depressive relapse.
J Affect Disord. 2013 Nov; 151(2):540-550.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The aim of this study was to assess whether different affective temperaments could be related to a specific mood disorder diagnosis and/or to different therapeutic choices in inpatients admitted for an acute relapse of their primary mood disorder.

METHOD

Hundred and twenty-nine inpatients were consecutively assessed by means of the Structured and Clinical Interview for axis-I disorders/Patient edition and by the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego auto-questionnaire, Young Mania Rating Scale, Hamilton Scale for Depression and for Anxiety, Brief Psychiatry Rating Scale, Clinical Global impression, Drug Attitude Inventory, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, and Symptoms Checklist-90 items version, along with records of clinical and demographic data.

RESULTS

The following prevalence rates for axis-I mood diagnoses were detected: bipolar disorder type I (BD-I, 28%), type II (31%), type not otherwise specified (BD-NOS, 33%), major depressive disorder (4%), and schizoaffective disorder (4%). Mean scores on the hyperthymic temperament scale were significantly higher in BD-I and BD-NOS, and in mixed and manic acute states. Hyperthymic temperament was significantly more frequent in BD-I and BD-NOS patients, whereas depressive temperament in BD-II ones. Hyperthymic and irritable temperaments were found more frequently in mixed episodes, while patients with depressive and mixed episodes more frequently exhibited anxious and depressive temperaments. Affective temperaments were associated with specific symptom and psychopathology clusters, with an orthogonal subdivision between hyperthymic temperament and anxious/cyclothymic/depressive/irritable temperaments. Therapeutic choices were often poorly differentiated among temperaments and mood states.

LIMITS

Cross-sectional design; sample size.

CONCLUSIONS

Although replication studies are needed, current results suggest that temperament-specific clusters of symptoms severity and psychopathology domains could be described.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Sciences and Odontostomatology-University "Federico II" of Naples, Italy. Electronic address: felix_ias@hotmail.com.Hermanas Hospitalarias, Villa San Giuseppe Hospital, Ascoli Piceno, Italy; FoRiPsi, Rome, Italy.Hermanas Hospitalarias, Villa San Giuseppe Hospital, Ascoli Piceno, Italy.Hermanas Hospitalarias, Villa San Giuseppe Hospital, Ascoli Piceno, Italy.Hermanas Hospitalarias, Villa San Giuseppe Hospital, Ascoli Piceno, Italy.NHS, Department of Mental Health, Psychiatric Service of Diagnosis and Treatment, Hospital "G. Mazzini", Asl 4, Teramo, Italy; Department of Neurosciences and Imaging, Chair of Psychiatry, University "G. d'Annunzio" of Chieti, Italy.Department of Neurosciences and Imaging, Chair of Psychiatry, University "G. d'Annunzio" of Chieti, Italy.Department of Education Science, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy.Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Sciences and Odontostomatology-University "Federico II" of Naples, Italy.Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Sciences and Odontostomatology-University "Federico II" of Naples, Italy.Department of Neurosciences and Imaging, Chair of Psychiatry, University "G. d'Annunzio" of Chieti, Italy.Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Psychiatry, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Sciences and Odontostomatology-University "Federico II" of Naples, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23856282

Citation

Iasevoli, Felice, et al. "Affective Temperaments Are Associated With Specific Clusters of Symptoms and Psychopathology: a Cross-sectional Study On Bipolar Disorder Inpatients in Acute Manic, Mixed, or Depressive Relapse." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 151, no. 2, 2013, pp. 540-550.
Iasevoli F, Valchera A, Di Giovambattista E, et al. Affective temperaments are associated with specific clusters of symptoms and psychopathology: a cross-sectional study on bipolar disorder inpatients in acute manic, mixed, or depressive relapse. J Affect Disord. 2013;151(2):540-550.
Iasevoli, F., Valchera, A., Di Giovambattista, E., Marconi, M., Rapagnani, M. P., De Berardis, D., Martinotti, G., Fornaro, M., Mazza, M., Tomasetti, C., Buonaguro, E. F., Di Giannantonio, M., Perugi, G., & de Bartolomeis, A. (2013). Affective temperaments are associated with specific clusters of symptoms and psychopathology: a cross-sectional study on bipolar disorder inpatients in acute manic, mixed, or depressive relapse. Journal of Affective Disorders, 151(2), 540-550. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2013.06.041
Iasevoli F, et al. Affective Temperaments Are Associated With Specific Clusters of Symptoms and Psychopathology: a Cross-sectional Study On Bipolar Disorder Inpatients in Acute Manic, Mixed, or Depressive Relapse. J Affect Disord. 2013;151(2):540-550. PubMed PMID: 23856282.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Affective temperaments are associated with specific clusters of symptoms and psychopathology: a cross-sectional study on bipolar disorder inpatients in acute manic, mixed, or depressive relapse. AU - Iasevoli,Felice, AU - Valchera,Alessandro, AU - Di Giovambattista,Emanuela, AU - Marconi,Massimo, AU - Rapagnani,Maria Paola, AU - De Berardis,Domenico, AU - Martinotti,Giovanni, AU - Fornaro,Michele, AU - Mazza,Monica, AU - Tomasetti,Carmine, AU - Buonaguro,Elisabetta F, AU - Di Giannantonio,Massimo, AU - Perugi,Giulio, AU - de Bartolomeis,Andrea, Y1 - 2013/07/12/ PY - 2013/04/12/received PY - 2013/06/17/revised PY - 2013/06/17/accepted PY - 2013/7/17/entrez PY - 2013/7/17/pubmed PY - 2014/5/14/medline KW - Acute relapse KW - Alcohol abuse KW - Bipolar disorder type-I KW - Hyperthymic temperament KW - Inpatients KW - Mood disorders SP - 540 EP - 550 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 151 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess whether different affective temperaments could be related to a specific mood disorder diagnosis and/or to different therapeutic choices in inpatients admitted for an acute relapse of their primary mood disorder. METHOD: Hundred and twenty-nine inpatients were consecutively assessed by means of the Structured and Clinical Interview for axis-I disorders/Patient edition and by the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego auto-questionnaire, Young Mania Rating Scale, Hamilton Scale for Depression and for Anxiety, Brief Psychiatry Rating Scale, Clinical Global impression, Drug Attitude Inventory, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, and Symptoms Checklist-90 items version, along with records of clinical and demographic data. RESULTS: The following prevalence rates for axis-I mood diagnoses were detected: bipolar disorder type I (BD-I, 28%), type II (31%), type not otherwise specified (BD-NOS, 33%), major depressive disorder (4%), and schizoaffective disorder (4%). Mean scores on the hyperthymic temperament scale were significantly higher in BD-I and BD-NOS, and in mixed and manic acute states. Hyperthymic temperament was significantly more frequent in BD-I and BD-NOS patients, whereas depressive temperament in BD-II ones. Hyperthymic and irritable temperaments were found more frequently in mixed episodes, while patients with depressive and mixed episodes more frequently exhibited anxious and depressive temperaments. Affective temperaments were associated with specific symptom and psychopathology clusters, with an orthogonal subdivision between hyperthymic temperament and anxious/cyclothymic/depressive/irritable temperaments. Therapeutic choices were often poorly differentiated among temperaments and mood states. LIMITS: Cross-sectional design; sample size. CONCLUSIONS: Although replication studies are needed, current results suggest that temperament-specific clusters of symptoms severity and psychopathology domains could be described. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23856282/Affective_temperaments_are_associated_with_specific_clusters_of_symptoms_and_psychopathology:_a_cross_sectional_study_on_bipolar_disorder_inpatients_in_acute_manic_mixed_or_depressive_relapse_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(13)00521-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -