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Elevated serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels in Alzheimer's disease.
Asia Pac Psychiatry 2014; 6(1):38-45AP

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Copper takes part in a variety of biological reduction-oxidation (redox) processes, and is an important cofactor of many redox enzymes. Ceruloplasmin, the copper-transporting protein, also possesses an important redox capacity.

METHODS

We assessed serum copper, ceruloplasmin and free-copper levels in 89 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (mean age, 77.83 years; 41 men, 48 women) and in 118 healthy individuals (mean age, 69.93 years; 50 men, 68 women). High (≥75th percentile), medium, and low (≤25th percentile) copper, ceruloplasmin and free-copper groups were classified according to their serum level.

RESULTS

Serum copper (P = 0.026) and ceruloplasmin (P = 0.001) levels were significantly higher in the AD group than in the control group. There was no significant difference in serum free-copper levels between AD and healthy elderly groups (P = 0.975). After adjusting for age differences, serum copper (P = 0.049) was still significantly higher in the AD group. Furthermore, serum copper levels correlated with scores on the Boston naming test (r = -0.151, P = 0.037), indicating a close relationship between copper levels and cognitive abilities.

DISCUSSION

The significant association between the copper concentration in peripheral serum and AD with elevated copper levels found in patients with AD is likely linked to the evolution of AD. Serum copper levels were significantly negatively correlated with scores on cognitive test subscores. AD patients may have significantly more "defective" ceruloplasmin, that is, apo-ceruloplasmin lacking its copper, than in healthy controls.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Sanggye Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23857910

Citation

Park, Jun-Hyun, et al. "Elevated Serum Copper and Ceruloplasmin Levels in Alzheimer's Disease." Asia-Pacific Psychiatry : Official Journal of the Pacific Rim College of Psychiatrists, vol. 6, no. 1, 2014, pp. 38-45.
Park JH, Lee DW, Park KS. Elevated serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels in Alzheimer's disease. Asia Pac Psychiatry. 2014;6(1):38-45.
Park, J. H., Lee, D. W., & Park, K. S. (2014). Elevated serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels in Alzheimer's disease. Asia-Pacific Psychiatry : Official Journal of the Pacific Rim College of Psychiatrists, 6(1), pp. 38-45. doi:10.1111/appy.12077.
Park JH, Lee DW, Park KS. Elevated Serum Copper and Ceruloplasmin Levels in Alzheimer's Disease. Asia Pac Psychiatry. 2014;6(1):38-45. PubMed PMID: 23857910.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Elevated serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels in Alzheimer's disease. AU - Park,Jun-Hyun, AU - Lee,Dong-Woo, AU - Park,Kyung Soo, Y1 - 2013/05/09/ PY - 2012/10/11/received PY - 2013/03/12/accepted PY - 2013/7/17/entrez PY - 2013/7/17/pubmed PY - 2014/10/25/medline KW - Alzheimer's disease KW - ceruloplasmin KW - copper KW - heavy metal toxicity KW - oxidation-reduction SP - 38 EP - 45 JF - Asia-Pacific psychiatry : official journal of the Pacific Rim College of Psychiatrists JO - Asia Pac Psychiatry VL - 6 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Copper takes part in a variety of biological reduction-oxidation (redox) processes, and is an important cofactor of many redox enzymes. Ceruloplasmin, the copper-transporting protein, also possesses an important redox capacity. METHODS: We assessed serum copper, ceruloplasmin and free-copper levels in 89 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (mean age, 77.83 years; 41 men, 48 women) and in 118 healthy individuals (mean age, 69.93 years; 50 men, 68 women). High (≥75th percentile), medium, and low (≤25th percentile) copper, ceruloplasmin and free-copper groups were classified according to their serum level. RESULTS: Serum copper (P = 0.026) and ceruloplasmin (P = 0.001) levels were significantly higher in the AD group than in the control group. There was no significant difference in serum free-copper levels between AD and healthy elderly groups (P = 0.975). After adjusting for age differences, serum copper (P = 0.049) was still significantly higher in the AD group. Furthermore, serum copper levels correlated with scores on the Boston naming test (r = -0.151, P = 0.037), indicating a close relationship between copper levels and cognitive abilities. DISCUSSION: The significant association between the copper concentration in peripheral serum and AD with elevated copper levels found in patients with AD is likely linked to the evolution of AD. Serum copper levels were significantly negatively correlated with scores on cognitive test subscores. AD patients may have significantly more "defective" ceruloplasmin, that is, apo-ceruloplasmin lacking its copper, than in healthy controls. SN - 1758-5872 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23857910/Elevated_serum_copper_and_ceruloplasmin_levels_in_Alzheimer's_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/appy.12077 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -