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The epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types I and II in Canadian blood donors.
Transfus Med. 2013 Oct; 23(5):358-66.TM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Blood donors in Canada have been tested for Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV) since 1990. We report the epidemiology, risk factors and lookback/traceback of HTLV-positive donors/recipients.

METHODS

The annual HTLV rate was calculated from 1990 to 2010. Residual risk was estimated as the product of incidence and window period. Twenty-nine HTLV-positive donors and 116 matched controls (ratio 1 : 4) were interviewed about risk factors. For HTLV-positive donations, lookback investigations involved identification of all previous donations, and attempting to locate and test recipients. Traceback was initiated when transfusion transmission was queried for HTLV-positive blood recipients. All donors of products that the recipient received were identified, with an attempt to locate and test them.

RESULTS

The HTLV rate decreased from 9.35 per 100,000 donations in 1990 to 1.11 in 2010. The residual risk of infection was 1 in 7.6 million donations. In logistic regression birth overseas (OR 18.7), history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR 32.9), sex with unknown background (OR 5.4) and blood transfusion (OR 8.9) were significant predictors. In the lookback study, of 109 HTLV-positive donors, 508 components were transfused, of whom 147 recipients were tested and 18 (12%) were positive. All were transfused prior to the implementation of donor testing. Twenty-three traceback investigations were requested involving 324 transfused untested products,of whom 219 (67.6%) of donors were tested and 13 (6%) were positive for HTLV.

CONCLUSIONS

With testing of the blood supply, the risk from HTLV is very low and while most HTLV-positive donors have risk factors, deferrable risk is rare.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Canadian Blood Services, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Department of Epidemiology & Community Medicine.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23859527

Citation

O'Brien, S F., et al. "The Epidemiology of Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Types I and II in Canadian Blood Donors." Transfusion Medicine (Oxford, England), vol. 23, no. 5, 2013, pp. 358-66.
O'Brien SF, Goldman M, Scalia V, et al. The epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types I and II in Canadian blood donors. Transfus Med. 2013;23(5):358-66.
O'Brien, S. F., Goldman, M., Scalia, V., Yi, Q. L., Fan, W., Xi, G., Dines, I. R., & Fearon, M. A. (2013). The epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types I and II in Canadian blood donors. Transfusion Medicine (Oxford, England), 23(5), 358-66. https://doi.org/10.1111/tme.12057
O'Brien SF, et al. The Epidemiology of Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Types I and II in Canadian Blood Donors. Transfus Med. 2013;23(5):358-66. PubMed PMID: 23859527.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types I and II in Canadian blood donors. AU - O'Brien,S F, AU - Goldman,M, AU - Scalia,V, AU - Yi,Q-L, AU - Fan,W, AU - Xi,G, AU - Dines,I R, AU - Fearon,M A, Y1 - 2013/07/17/ PY - 2013/03/08/received PY - 2013/06/11/revised PY - 2013/06/16/accepted PY - 2013/7/18/entrez PY - 2013/7/19/pubmed PY - 2015/7/15/medline KW - HTLV KW - epidemiology KW - risk factors SP - 358 EP - 66 JF - Transfusion medicine (Oxford, England) JO - Transfus Med VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Blood donors in Canada have been tested for Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV) since 1990. We report the epidemiology, risk factors and lookback/traceback of HTLV-positive donors/recipients. METHODS: The annual HTLV rate was calculated from 1990 to 2010. Residual risk was estimated as the product of incidence and window period. Twenty-nine HTLV-positive donors and 116 matched controls (ratio 1 : 4) were interviewed about risk factors. For HTLV-positive donations, lookback investigations involved identification of all previous donations, and attempting to locate and test recipients. Traceback was initiated when transfusion transmission was queried for HTLV-positive blood recipients. All donors of products that the recipient received were identified, with an attempt to locate and test them. RESULTS: The HTLV rate decreased from 9.35 per 100,000 donations in 1990 to 1.11 in 2010. The residual risk of infection was 1 in 7.6 million donations. In logistic regression birth overseas (OR 18.7), history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR 32.9), sex with unknown background (OR 5.4) and blood transfusion (OR 8.9) were significant predictors. In the lookback study, of 109 HTLV-positive donors, 508 components were transfused, of whom 147 recipients were tested and 18 (12%) were positive. All were transfused prior to the implementation of donor testing. Twenty-three traceback investigations were requested involving 324 transfused untested products,of whom 219 (67.6%) of donors were tested and 13 (6%) were positive for HTLV. CONCLUSIONS: With testing of the blood supply, the risk from HTLV is very low and while most HTLV-positive donors have risk factors, deferrable risk is rare. SN - 1365-3148 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23859527/The_epidemiology_of_human_T_cell_lymphotropic_virus_types_I_and_II_in_Canadian_blood_donors_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/tme.12057 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -