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Native predators do not influence invasion success of pacific lionfish on Caribbean reefs.
PLoS One. 2013; 8(7):e68259.Plos

Abstract

Biotic resistance, the process by which new colonists are excluded from a community by predation from and/or competition with resident species, can prevent or limit species invasions. We examined whether biotic resistance by native predators on Caribbean coral reefs has influenced the invasion success of red lionfishes (Pterois volitans and Pterois miles), piscivores from the Indo-Pacific. Specifically, we surveyed the abundance (density and biomass) of lionfish and native predatory fishes that could interact with lionfish (either through predation or competition) on 71 reefs in three biogeographic regions of the Caribbean. We recorded protection status of the reefs, and abiotic variables including depth, habitat type, and wind/wave exposure at each site. We found no relationship between the density or biomass of lionfish and that of native predators. However, lionfish densities were significantly lower on windward sites, potentially because of habitat preferences, and in marine protected areas, most likely because of ongoing removal efforts by reserve managers. Our results suggest that interactions with native predators do not influence the colonization or post-establishment population density of invasive lionfish on Caribbean reefs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America. snhackerott@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23874565

Citation

Hackerott, Serena, et al. "Native Predators Do Not Influence Invasion Success of Pacific Lionfish On Caribbean Reefs." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 7, 2013, pp. e68259.
Hackerott S, Valdivia A, Green SJ, et al. Native predators do not influence invasion success of pacific lionfish on Caribbean reefs. PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e68259.
Hackerott, S., Valdivia, A., Green, S. J., Côté, I. M., Cox, C. E., Akins, L., Layman, C. A., Precht, W. F., & Bruno, J. F. (2013). Native predators do not influence invasion success of pacific lionfish on Caribbean reefs. PloS One, 8(7), e68259. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0068259
Hackerott S, et al. Native Predators Do Not Influence Invasion Success of Pacific Lionfish On Caribbean Reefs. PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e68259. PubMed PMID: 23874565.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Native predators do not influence invasion success of pacific lionfish on Caribbean reefs. AU - Hackerott,Serena, AU - Valdivia,Abel, AU - Green,Stephanie J, AU - Côté,Isabelle M, AU - Cox,Courtney E, AU - Akins,Lad, AU - Layman,Craig A, AU - Precht,William F, AU - Bruno,John F, Y1 - 2013/07/11/ PY - 2013/02/07/received PY - 2013/05/27/accepted PY - 2013/7/23/entrez PY - 2013/7/23/pubmed PY - 2014/4/18/medline SP - e68259 EP - e68259 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 8 IS - 7 N2 - Biotic resistance, the process by which new colonists are excluded from a community by predation from and/or competition with resident species, can prevent or limit species invasions. We examined whether biotic resistance by native predators on Caribbean coral reefs has influenced the invasion success of red lionfishes (Pterois volitans and Pterois miles), piscivores from the Indo-Pacific. Specifically, we surveyed the abundance (density and biomass) of lionfish and native predatory fishes that could interact with lionfish (either through predation or competition) on 71 reefs in three biogeographic regions of the Caribbean. We recorded protection status of the reefs, and abiotic variables including depth, habitat type, and wind/wave exposure at each site. We found no relationship between the density or biomass of lionfish and that of native predators. However, lionfish densities were significantly lower on windward sites, potentially because of habitat preferences, and in marine protected areas, most likely because of ongoing removal efforts by reserve managers. Our results suggest that interactions with native predators do not influence the colonization or post-establishment population density of invasive lionfish on Caribbean reefs. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23874565/Native_predators_do_not_influence_invasion_success_of_pacific_lionfish_on_Caribbean_reefs_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0068259 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -