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Norovirus disease in the United States.
Emerg Infect Dis 2013; 19(8):1198-205EI

Abstract

Although recognized as the leading cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis across all age groups, norovirus has remained poorly characterized with respect to its endemic disease incidence. Use of different methods, including attributable proportion extrapolation, population-based surveillance, and indirect modeling, in several recent studies has considerably improved norovirus disease incidence estimates for the United States. Norovirus causes an average of 570-800 deaths, 56,000-71,000 hospitalizations, 400,000 emergency department visits, 1.7-1.9 million outpatient visits, and 19-21 million total illnesses per year. Persons >65 years of age are at greatest risk for norovirus-associated death, and children <5 years of age have the highest rates of norovirus-associated medical care visits. Endemic norovirus disease occurs year round but exhibits a pronounced winter peak and increases by ≤ 50% during years in which pandemic strains emerge. These findings support continued development and targeting of appropriate interventions, including vaccines, for norovirus disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. ajhall@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23876403

Citation

Hall, Aron J., et al. "Norovirus Disease in the United States." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 19, no. 8, 2013, pp. 1198-205.
Hall AJ, Lopman BA, Payne DC, et al. Norovirus disease in the United States. Emerging Infect Dis. 2013;19(8):1198-205.
Hall, A. J., Lopman, B. A., Payne, D. C., Patel, M. M., Gastañaduy, P. A., Vinjé, J., & Parashar, U. D. (2013). Norovirus disease in the United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(8), pp. 1198-205. doi:10.3201/eid1908.130465.
Hall AJ, et al. Norovirus Disease in the United States. Emerging Infect Dis. 2013;19(8):1198-205. PubMed PMID: 23876403.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Norovirus disease in the United States. AU - Hall,Aron J, AU - Lopman,Ben A, AU - Payne,Daniel C, AU - Patel,Manish M, AU - Gastañaduy,Paul A, AU - Vinjé,Jan, AU - Parashar,Umesh D, PY - 2013/7/24/entrez PY - 2013/7/24/pubmed PY - 2014/2/12/medline KW - United States KW - epidemic acute gastroenteritis KW - incidence KW - norovirus KW - norovirus disease KW - viruses SP - 1198 EP - 205 JF - Emerging infectious diseases JO - Emerging Infect. Dis. VL - 19 IS - 8 N2 - Although recognized as the leading cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis across all age groups, norovirus has remained poorly characterized with respect to its endemic disease incidence. Use of different methods, including attributable proportion extrapolation, population-based surveillance, and indirect modeling, in several recent studies has considerably improved norovirus disease incidence estimates for the United States. Norovirus causes an average of 570-800 deaths, 56,000-71,000 hospitalizations, 400,000 emergency department visits, 1.7-1.9 million outpatient visits, and 19-21 million total illnesses per year. Persons >65 years of age are at greatest risk for norovirus-associated death, and children <5 years of age have the highest rates of norovirus-associated medical care visits. Endemic norovirus disease occurs year round but exhibits a pronounced winter peak and increases by ≤ 50% during years in which pandemic strains emerge. These findings support continued development and targeting of appropriate interventions, including vaccines, for norovirus disease. SN - 1080-6059 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23876403/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1908.130465 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -