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Secondary transfer effects of intergroup contact via social identity complexity.
Br J Soc Psychol. 2014 Sep; 53(3):443-62.BJ

Abstract

Secondary transfer effects (STEs) of intergroup contact refer to the generalization of contact effects from a primary encountered outgroup to attitudes towards secondary outgroups (Pettigrew, 2009). Using two large, cross-sectional data sets from Germany (N = 1,381) and Northern Ireland (N = 1,948), this article examined the extent to which STEs of intergroup contact on attitudes towards a range of secondary outgroups occur via a previously unexplored psychological construct, social identity complexity (operationalized as similarity complexity and overlap complexity). Study 1 found primary outgroup contact to be associated with greater similarity complexity, but no indirect effects on secondary outgroup attitudes via complexity emerged. Study 2, however, revealed indirect positive relationships between primary outgroup contact and secondary outgroup attitudes via increased similarity complexity and overlap complexity. These relationships were obtained while controlling for two previously tested mediating mechanisms, attitude generalization (operationalized as primary outgroup attitude) and deprovincialization (operationalized as ingroup attitude and identification). We discuss the theoretical implications of these findings and the contribution of social identity complexity to understanding processes underlying STEs of contact.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23879325

Citation

Schmid, Katharina, et al. "Secondary Transfer Effects of Intergroup Contact Via Social Identity Complexity." The British Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 53, no. 3, 2014, pp. 443-62.
Schmid K, Hewstone M, Tausch N. Secondary transfer effects of intergroup contact via social identity complexity. Br J Soc Psychol. 2014;53(3):443-62.
Schmid, K., Hewstone, M., & Tausch, N. (2014). Secondary transfer effects of intergroup contact via social identity complexity. The British Journal of Social Psychology, 53(3), 443-62. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12045
Schmid K, Hewstone M, Tausch N. Secondary Transfer Effects of Intergroup Contact Via Social Identity Complexity. Br J Soc Psychol. 2014;53(3):443-62. PubMed PMID: 23879325.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Secondary transfer effects of intergroup contact via social identity complexity. AU - Schmid,Katharina, AU - Hewstone,Miles, AU - Tausch,Nicole, Y1 - 2013/07/23/ PY - 2012/01/31/received PY - 2013/06/12/revised PY - 2013/7/25/entrez PY - 2013/7/25/pubmed PY - 2015/6/24/medline KW - attitude generalization KW - deprovincialization KW - intergroup contact KW - secondary transfer effects KW - social identity complexity SP - 443 EP - 62 JF - The British journal of social psychology JO - Br J Soc Psychol VL - 53 IS - 3 N2 - Secondary transfer effects (STEs) of intergroup contact refer to the generalization of contact effects from a primary encountered outgroup to attitudes towards secondary outgroups (Pettigrew, 2009). Using two large, cross-sectional data sets from Germany (N = 1,381) and Northern Ireland (N = 1,948), this article examined the extent to which STEs of intergroup contact on attitudes towards a range of secondary outgroups occur via a previously unexplored psychological construct, social identity complexity (operationalized as similarity complexity and overlap complexity). Study 1 found primary outgroup contact to be associated with greater similarity complexity, but no indirect effects on secondary outgroup attitudes via complexity emerged. Study 2, however, revealed indirect positive relationships between primary outgroup contact and secondary outgroup attitudes via increased similarity complexity and overlap complexity. These relationships were obtained while controlling for two previously tested mediating mechanisms, attitude generalization (operationalized as primary outgroup attitude) and deprovincialization (operationalized as ingroup attitude and identification). We discuss the theoretical implications of these findings and the contribution of social identity complexity to understanding processes underlying STEs of contact. SN - 2044-8309 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23879325/Secondary_transfer_effects_of_intergroup_contact_via_social_identity_complexity_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12045 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -