Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Commonalities and differences in infant feeding attitudes and practices in the context of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: a metasynthesis.
AIDS Care 2014; 26(2):214-25AC

Abstract

Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) has been identified as a key intervention to promote infant health and to reduce the vertical transmission of HIV. Despite this knowledge and increased resources to promote EBF, the practice in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) remains low among HIV+ women. Although a number of qualitative studies have been conducted throughout SSA, the influences on and consequences of infant feeding choices of HIV+ mothers' findings have not been regarded systematically. Therefore, our objective was to identify overarching themes, commonalities, and differences in infant feeding choices among qualitative studies with HIV+ mothers in SSA. Sixteen qualitative studies of infant feeding practices in the context of HIV were identified. Noblit and Hare's seven-step metasynthesis methodology was used to analyze the experiences of HIV+ women and those who provide infant feeding services/counseling. Data were available from approximately 920 participants (i.e., 750 HIV+ mothers, 109 health-care providers, and 62 family members) across 13 SSA countries from 2000 to 2011. From these data, five themes emerged within which 3-4 overarching key metaphors were identified. The consistency of key metaphors across a variety of geographic, economic, and cultural settings suggest the importance of approaching infant feeding holistically, within the context of maternal knowledge, health-care support, family resources, and cultural expectations. EBF campaigns in SSA are more likely to successfully support optimal health for infants and a safe supportive environment for their mothers when the impact of infant feeding decisions are evaluated across these themes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a School of Nursing , University of Connecticut , Storrs , CT , USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23879637

Citation

Tuthill, Emily, et al. "Commonalities and Differences in Infant Feeding Attitudes and Practices in the Context of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: a Metasynthesis." AIDS Care, vol. 26, no. 2, 2014, pp. 214-25.
Tuthill E, McGrath J, Young S. Commonalities and differences in infant feeding attitudes and practices in the context of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: a metasynthesis. AIDS Care. 2014;26(2):214-25.
Tuthill, E., McGrath, J., & Young, S. (2014). Commonalities and differences in infant feeding attitudes and practices in the context of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: a metasynthesis. AIDS Care, 26(2), pp. 214-25. doi:10.1080/09540121.2013.813625.
Tuthill E, McGrath J, Young S. Commonalities and Differences in Infant Feeding Attitudes and Practices in the Context of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: a Metasynthesis. AIDS Care. 2014;26(2):214-25. PubMed PMID: 23879637.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Commonalities and differences in infant feeding attitudes and practices in the context of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: a metasynthesis. AU - Tuthill,Emily, AU - McGrath,Jacqueline, AU - Young,Sera, Y1 - 2013/07/23/ PY - 2013/7/25/entrez PY - 2013/7/25/pubmed PY - 2014/8/19/medline SP - 214 EP - 25 JF - AIDS care JO - AIDS Care VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) has been identified as a key intervention to promote infant health and to reduce the vertical transmission of HIV. Despite this knowledge and increased resources to promote EBF, the practice in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) remains low among HIV+ women. Although a number of qualitative studies have been conducted throughout SSA, the influences on and consequences of infant feeding choices of HIV+ mothers' findings have not been regarded systematically. Therefore, our objective was to identify overarching themes, commonalities, and differences in infant feeding choices among qualitative studies with HIV+ mothers in SSA. Sixteen qualitative studies of infant feeding practices in the context of HIV were identified. Noblit and Hare's seven-step metasynthesis methodology was used to analyze the experiences of HIV+ women and those who provide infant feeding services/counseling. Data were available from approximately 920 participants (i.e., 750 HIV+ mothers, 109 health-care providers, and 62 family members) across 13 SSA countries from 2000 to 2011. From these data, five themes emerged within which 3-4 overarching key metaphors were identified. The consistency of key metaphors across a variety of geographic, economic, and cultural settings suggest the importance of approaching infant feeding holistically, within the context of maternal knowledge, health-care support, family resources, and cultural expectations. EBF campaigns in SSA are more likely to successfully support optimal health for infants and a safe supportive environment for their mothers when the impact of infant feeding decisions are evaluated across these themes. SN - 1360-0451 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23879637/Commonalities_and_differences_in_infant_feeding_attitudes_and_practices_in_the_context_of_HIV_in_sub_Saharan_Africa:_a_metasynthesis_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09540121.2013.813625 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -