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Dose-response meta-analysis on coffee, tea and caffeine consumption with risk of Parkinson's disease.
Geriatr Gerontol Int. 2014 Apr; 14(2):430-9.GG

Abstract

AIMS

A dose-response meta-analysis was carried out between Parkinson's disease (PD) risk, and coffee, tea and caffeine consumption.

METHODS

A comprehensive search was carried out to identify eligible studies. The fixed or random effect model was used based on heterogeneity test. The dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline.

RESULTS

A total of 13 articles involving 901 764 participants for coffee, eight articles involving 344 895 participants for tea and seven articles involving 492 724 participants for caffeine were included. A non-linear relationship was found between coffee consumption and PD risk overall, and the strength of protection reached the maximum at approximately 3 cups/day (smoking-adjusted relative risk: 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.65-0.81). A linear relationship was found between tea and caffeine consumption, and PD risk overall, and the smoking-adjusted risk of PD decreased by 26% and 17% for every two cups/day and 200 mg/day increments, respectively. The association of coffee and tea consumption with PD risk was stronger for men than that for women, and the association of caffeine consumption with PD risk was stronger for ever users of hormones than that for never users of hormones among postmenopausal women. The aforementioned associations were weaker for USA relative to Europe or Asia.

CONCLUSIONS

A linear dose-relationship for decreased PD risk with tea and caffeine consumption was found, whereas the strength of protection reached a maximum at approximately 3 cups/day for coffee consumption overall. Further studies are required to confirm the findings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social Medicine and Health Administration, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Jinan, China; Department of Teaching Affaires, Qingdao University, Qingdao, China.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23879665

Citation

Qi, Hui, and Shixue Li. "Dose-response Meta-analysis On Coffee, Tea and Caffeine Consumption With Risk of Parkinson's Disease." Geriatrics & Gerontology International, vol. 14, no. 2, 2014, pp. 430-9.
Qi H, Li S. Dose-response meta-analysis on coffee, tea and caffeine consumption with risk of Parkinson's disease. Geriatr Gerontol Int. 2014;14(2):430-9.
Qi, H., & Li, S. (2014). Dose-response meta-analysis on coffee, tea and caffeine consumption with risk of Parkinson's disease. Geriatrics & Gerontology International, 14(2), 430-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/ggi.12123
Qi H, Li S. Dose-response Meta-analysis On Coffee, Tea and Caffeine Consumption With Risk of Parkinson's Disease. Geriatr Gerontol Int. 2014;14(2):430-9. PubMed PMID: 23879665.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dose-response meta-analysis on coffee, tea and caffeine consumption with risk of Parkinson's disease. AU - Qi,Hui, AU - Li,Shixue, Y1 - 2013/07/23/ PY - 2013/06/13/accepted PY - 2013/7/25/entrez PY - 2013/7/25/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline KW - Parkinson's disease KW - caffeine KW - coffee KW - dose-response meta-analysis KW - tea SP - 430 EP - 9 JF - Geriatrics & gerontology international JO - Geriatr Gerontol Int VL - 14 IS - 2 N2 - AIMS: A dose-response meta-analysis was carried out between Parkinson's disease (PD) risk, and coffee, tea and caffeine consumption. METHODS: A comprehensive search was carried out to identify eligible studies. The fixed or random effect model was used based on heterogeneity test. The dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline. RESULTS: A total of 13 articles involving 901 764 participants for coffee, eight articles involving 344 895 participants for tea and seven articles involving 492 724 participants for caffeine were included. A non-linear relationship was found between coffee consumption and PD risk overall, and the strength of protection reached the maximum at approximately 3 cups/day (smoking-adjusted relative risk: 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.65-0.81). A linear relationship was found between tea and caffeine consumption, and PD risk overall, and the smoking-adjusted risk of PD decreased by 26% and 17% for every two cups/day and 200 mg/day increments, respectively. The association of coffee and tea consumption with PD risk was stronger for men than that for women, and the association of caffeine consumption with PD risk was stronger for ever users of hormones than that for never users of hormones among postmenopausal women. The aforementioned associations were weaker for USA relative to Europe or Asia. CONCLUSIONS: A linear dose-relationship for decreased PD risk with tea and caffeine consumption was found, whereas the strength of protection reached a maximum at approximately 3 cups/day for coffee consumption overall. Further studies are required to confirm the findings. SN - 1447-0594 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23879665/Dose_response_meta_analysis_on_coffee_tea_and_caffeine_consumption_with_risk_of_Parkinson's_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ggi.12123 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -