Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Objective olfactory outcomes after revision endoscopic sinus surgery.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2013 Jul-Aug; 27(4):e96-100AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients who suffer from hyposmia and anosmia report a negative effect on their overall quality of life. Smell disturbance of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) can improve after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Although several studies have shown that 50-83% of patients may notice an improvement in olfactory function after ESS, the olfactory improvement after revision ESS (RESS), especially by objective measurements, is still lacking.

METHODS

Olfactory function was assessed by the traditional Chinese version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT-TC) preoperatively and postoperatively, recorded as smell identification test (SIT) score. Olfactory outcomes from anosmia to hyposmia/normosmia, or from hyposmia to normosmia, were considered as "improvement." Postoperative assessments were divided into two periods: period 1 (P1) is defined as >6 but <12 months postoperatively; period 2 (P2) is defined as >12 but <24 months postoperatively.

RESULTS

Thirty-two patients with smell disturbance preoperatively (period 0 [P0]) and confirmed by UPSIT-TC were enrolled into this study. Mean SIT score at P0 was 13.3; mean SIT score at P1 was 18.6; mean SIT score at P2 was 20.4. The presence of nasal polyps blocking the olfactory cleft were associated with better olfaction improvements (p < 0.05) as was the degree of mucosal swelling. The overall improvement rates were 44.8 and 47.8% at P1 and P2, respectively.

CONCLUSION

RESS resulted in objective evidence of olfactory improvement in approximately one-half of our cohort over 16 months of follow-up and offers a treatment option for an otherwise poor prognosis condition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology, Kuang-Tien General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23883800

Citation

Hsu, Chao-Yuan, et al. "Objective Olfactory Outcomes After Revision Endoscopic Sinus Surgery." American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy, vol. 27, no. 4, 2013, pp. e96-100.
Hsu CY, Wang YP, Shen PH, et al. Objective olfactory outcomes after revision endoscopic sinus surgery. Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2013;27(4):e96-100.
Hsu, C. Y., Wang, Y. P., Shen, P. H., Weitzel, E. K., Lai, J. T., & Wormald, P. J. (2013). Objective olfactory outcomes after revision endoscopic sinus surgery. American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy, 27(4), pp. e96-100. doi:10.2500/ajra.2013.27.3939.
Hsu CY, et al. Objective Olfactory Outcomes After Revision Endoscopic Sinus Surgery. Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2013;27(4):e96-100. PubMed PMID: 23883800.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Objective olfactory outcomes after revision endoscopic sinus surgery. AU - Hsu,Chao-Yuan, AU - Wang,Ying-Piao, AU - Shen,Ping-Hung, AU - Weitzel,Erik Kent, AU - Lai,Jen-Tsung, AU - Wormald,Peter-John, PY - 2013/7/26/entrez PY - 2013/7/26/pubmed PY - 2014/1/1/medline SP - e96 EP - 100 JF - American journal of rhinology & allergy JO - Am J Rhinol Allergy VL - 27 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Patients who suffer from hyposmia and anosmia report a negative effect on their overall quality of life. Smell disturbance of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) can improve after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Although several studies have shown that 50-83% of patients may notice an improvement in olfactory function after ESS, the olfactory improvement after revision ESS (RESS), especially by objective measurements, is still lacking. METHODS: Olfactory function was assessed by the traditional Chinese version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT-TC) preoperatively and postoperatively, recorded as smell identification test (SIT) score. Olfactory outcomes from anosmia to hyposmia/normosmia, or from hyposmia to normosmia, were considered as "improvement." Postoperative assessments were divided into two periods: period 1 (P1) is defined as >6 but <12 months postoperatively; period 2 (P2) is defined as >12 but <24 months postoperatively. RESULTS: Thirty-two patients with smell disturbance preoperatively (period 0 [P0]) and confirmed by UPSIT-TC were enrolled into this study. Mean SIT score at P0 was 13.3; mean SIT score at P1 was 18.6; mean SIT score at P2 was 20.4. The presence of nasal polyps blocking the olfactory cleft were associated with better olfaction improvements (p < 0.05) as was the degree of mucosal swelling. The overall improvement rates were 44.8 and 47.8% at P1 and P2, respectively. CONCLUSION: RESS resulted in objective evidence of olfactory improvement in approximately one-half of our cohort over 16 months of follow-up and offers a treatment option for an otherwise poor prognosis condition. SN - 1945-8932 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23883800/Objective_olfactory_outcomes_after_revision_endoscopic_sinus_surgery_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.2500/ajra.2013.27.3939?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -