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Predicting the transition from frequent cannabis use to cannabis dependence: a three-year prospective study.
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013 Dec 01; 133(2):352-9.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Frequent cannabis users are at high risk of dependence, still most (near) daily users are not dependent. It is unknown why some frequent users develop dependence, whereas others do not. This study aims to identify predictors of first-incidence DSM-IV cannabis dependence in frequent cannabis users.

METHODS

A prospective cohort of frequent cannabis users (aged 18-30, n=600) with baseline and two follow-up assessments (18 and 36 months) was used. Only participants without lifetime diagnosis of DSM-IV cannabis dependence at baseline (n=269) were selected. Incidence of DSM-IV cannabis dependence was established using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 3.0. Variables assessed as potential predictors of the development of cannabis dependence included sociodemographic factors, cannabis use variables (e.g., motives, consumption habits, cannabis exposure), vulnerability factors (e.g., childhood adversity, family history of mental disorders or substance use problems, personality, mental disorders), and stress factors (e.g., life events, social support).

RESULTS

Three-year cumulative incidence of cannabis dependence was 37.2% (95% CI=30.7-43.8%). Independent predictors of the first incidence of cannabis dependence included: living alone, coping motives for cannabis use, number and type of recent negative life events (major financial problems), and number and type of cannabis use disorder symptoms (impaired control over use). Cannabis exposure variables and stable vulnerability factors did not independently predict first incidence of cannabis dependence.

CONCLUSIONS

In a high risk population of young adult frequent cannabis users, current problems are more important predictors of first incidence cannabis dependence than the level and type of cannabis exposure and stable vulnerability factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Trimbos Institute, Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction, PO Box 725, 3500 AS Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: ppol@trimbos.nl.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23886472

Citation

van der Pol, Peggy, et al. "Predicting the Transition From Frequent Cannabis Use to Cannabis Dependence: a Three-year Prospective Study." Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 133, no. 2, 2013, pp. 352-9.
van der Pol P, Liebregts N, de Graaf R, et al. Predicting the transition from frequent cannabis use to cannabis dependence: a three-year prospective study. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013;133(2):352-9.
van der Pol, P., Liebregts, N., de Graaf, R., Korf, D. J., van den Brink, W., & van Laar, M. (2013). Predicting the transition from frequent cannabis use to cannabis dependence: a three-year prospective study. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 133(2), 352-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2013.06.009
van der Pol P, et al. Predicting the Transition From Frequent Cannabis Use to Cannabis Dependence: a Three-year Prospective Study. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013 Dec 1;133(2):352-9. PubMed PMID: 23886472.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predicting the transition from frequent cannabis use to cannabis dependence: a three-year prospective study. AU - van der Pol,Peggy, AU - Liebregts,Nienke, AU - de Graaf,Ron, AU - Korf,Dirk J, AU - van den Brink,Wim, AU - van Laar,Margriet, Y1 - 2013/07/22/ PY - 2013/02/06/received PY - 2013/05/27/revised PY - 2013/06/14/accepted PY - 2013/7/27/entrez PY - 2013/7/28/pubmed PY - 2014/6/24/medline KW - Cannabis dependence KW - Exposure KW - Frequent cannabis use KW - Longitudinal KW - Risk factors SP - 352 EP - 9 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 133 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Frequent cannabis users are at high risk of dependence, still most (near) daily users are not dependent. It is unknown why some frequent users develop dependence, whereas others do not. This study aims to identify predictors of first-incidence DSM-IV cannabis dependence in frequent cannabis users. METHODS: A prospective cohort of frequent cannabis users (aged 18-30, n=600) with baseline and two follow-up assessments (18 and 36 months) was used. Only participants without lifetime diagnosis of DSM-IV cannabis dependence at baseline (n=269) were selected. Incidence of DSM-IV cannabis dependence was established using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 3.0. Variables assessed as potential predictors of the development of cannabis dependence included sociodemographic factors, cannabis use variables (e.g., motives, consumption habits, cannabis exposure), vulnerability factors (e.g., childhood adversity, family history of mental disorders or substance use problems, personality, mental disorders), and stress factors (e.g., life events, social support). RESULTS: Three-year cumulative incidence of cannabis dependence was 37.2% (95% CI=30.7-43.8%). Independent predictors of the first incidence of cannabis dependence included: living alone, coping motives for cannabis use, number and type of recent negative life events (major financial problems), and number and type of cannabis use disorder symptoms (impaired control over use). Cannabis exposure variables and stable vulnerability factors did not independently predict first incidence of cannabis dependence. CONCLUSIONS: In a high risk population of young adult frequent cannabis users, current problems are more important predictors of first incidence cannabis dependence than the level and type of cannabis exposure and stable vulnerability factors. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23886472/Predicting_the_transition_from_frequent_cannabis_use_to_cannabis_dependence:_a_three_year_prospective_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(13)00228-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -