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Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis: from anecdote to translational medicine.
Benef Microbes. 2014 Jun 01; 5(2):185-99.BM

Abstract

Acne vulgaris has long been postulated to feature a gastrointestinal mechanism, dating back 80 years to dermatologists John H. Stokes and Donald M. Pillsbury. They hypothesised that emotional states (e.g. depression and anxiety) could alter normal intestinal microbiota, increase intestinal permeability, and contribute to systemic inflammation. They were also among the first to propose the use of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus cultures. In recent years, aspects of this gut-brain-skin theory have been further validated via modern scientific investigations. It is evident that gut microbes and oral probiotics could be linked to the skin, and particularly acne severity, by their ability to influence systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, glycaemic control, tissue lipid content, and even mood. This intricate relationship between gut microbiota and the skin may also be influenced by diet, a current area of intense scrutiny by those who study acne. Here we provide a historical background to the gut-brain-skin theory in acne, followed by a summary of contemporary investigations and clinical implications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA.New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 150 Bergen Street, Newark, NJ 07103, USA.Genuine Health, 775 East Blithedale Avenue, Suite 364, Mill Valley, CA 94941, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23886975

Citation

Bowe, W, et al. "Acne Vulgaris, Probiotics and the Gut-brain-skin Axis: From Anecdote to Translational Medicine." Beneficial Microbes, vol. 5, no. 2, 2014, pp. 185-99.
Bowe W, Patel NB, Logan AC. Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis: from anecdote to translational medicine. Benef Microbes. 2014;5(2):185-99.
Bowe, W., Patel, N. B., & Logan, A. C. (2014). Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis: from anecdote to translational medicine. Beneficial Microbes, 5(2), 185-99. https://doi.org/10.3920/BM2012.0060
Bowe W, Patel NB, Logan AC. Acne Vulgaris, Probiotics and the Gut-brain-skin Axis: From Anecdote to Translational Medicine. Benef Microbes. 2014 Jun 1;5(2):185-99. PubMed PMID: 23886975.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis: from anecdote to translational medicine. AU - Bowe,W, AU - Patel,N B, AU - Logan,A C, PY - 2013/7/27/entrez PY - 2013/7/28/pubmed PY - 2014/11/18/medline KW - acne KW - anxiety KW - brain KW - depression KW - diet KW - gastrointestinal tract KW - gut KW - microbiota KW - probiotics KW - skin SP - 185 EP - 99 JF - Beneficial microbes JO - Benef Microbes VL - 5 IS - 2 N2 - Acne vulgaris has long been postulated to feature a gastrointestinal mechanism, dating back 80 years to dermatologists John H. Stokes and Donald M. Pillsbury. They hypothesised that emotional states (e.g. depression and anxiety) could alter normal intestinal microbiota, increase intestinal permeability, and contribute to systemic inflammation. They were also among the first to propose the use of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus cultures. In recent years, aspects of this gut-brain-skin theory have been further validated via modern scientific investigations. It is evident that gut microbes and oral probiotics could be linked to the skin, and particularly acne severity, by their ability to influence systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, glycaemic control, tissue lipid content, and even mood. This intricate relationship between gut microbiota and the skin may also be influenced by diet, a current area of intense scrutiny by those who study acne. Here we provide a historical background to the gut-brain-skin theory in acne, followed by a summary of contemporary investigations and clinical implications. SN - 1876-2891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23886975/Acne_vulgaris_probiotics_and_the_gut_brain_skin_axis:_from_anecdote_to_translational_medicine_ L2 - https://www.wageningenacademic.com/doi/10.3920/BM2012.0060?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -