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Uptake and toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in cultured primary brain astrocytes.
Nanotoxicology. 2014 Nov; 8(7):775-85.N

Abstract

To test for consequences of an exposure of brain cells to copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs), we synthesised and characterised dimercaptosuccinate-coated CuO-NPs. These particles had a diameter of around 5 nm as determined by transmission electron microscopy, while their average hydrodynamic diameter in aqueous dispersion was 136 ± 4 nm. Dispersion in cell-culture medium containing 10% fetal calf serum increased the hydrodynamic diameter to 178 ± 12 nm and shifted the zeta potential of the particles from -49 ± 7 mV (in water) to -10 ± 3 mV. Exposure of cultured primary brain astrocytes to CuO-NPs increased the cellular copper levels and compromised the cell viability in a time-, concentration- and temperature-dependent manner. Application of CuO-NPs in concentrations above 100 µM copper (6.4 µg/ml) severely compromised the viability of the cells, as demonstrated by a lowered 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction capacity, a lowered cellular lactate dehydrogenase activity and an increased membrane permeability for the fluorescent dye propidium iodide. Copper internalisation as well as cell toxicity of astrocytes exposed to CuO-NPs were similar to that observed for cells that had been incubated with copper salts. The CuO-NP-induced toxicity was accompanied by an increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells. Both, ROS formation and cell toxicity in CuO-NP-treated astrocytes, were lowered in the presence of the cell-permeable copper chelator tetrathiomolybdate. These data demonstrate that CuO-NPs are taken up by cultured astrocytes and suggest that excess of internalised CuO-NPs cause cell toxicity by accelerating the formation of ROS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen, University of Bremen , Bremen , Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23889294

Citation

Bulcke, Felix, et al. "Uptake and Toxicity of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles in Cultured Primary Brain Astrocytes." Nanotoxicology, vol. 8, no. 7, 2014, pp. 775-85.
Bulcke F, Thiel K, Dringen R. Uptake and toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in cultured primary brain astrocytes. Nanotoxicology. 2014;8(7):775-85.
Bulcke, F., Thiel, K., & Dringen, R. (2014). Uptake and toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in cultured primary brain astrocytes. Nanotoxicology, 8(7), 775-85. https://doi.org/10.3109/17435390.2013.829591
Bulcke F, Thiel K, Dringen R. Uptake and Toxicity of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles in Cultured Primary Brain Astrocytes. Nanotoxicology. 2014;8(7):775-85. PubMed PMID: 23889294.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Uptake and toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in cultured primary brain astrocytes. AU - Bulcke,Felix, AU - Thiel,Karsten, AU - Dringen,Ralf, Y1 - 2013/08/22/ PY - 2013/7/30/entrez PY - 2013/7/31/pubmed PY - 2014/7/16/medline SP - 775 EP - 85 JF - Nanotoxicology JO - Nanotoxicology VL - 8 IS - 7 N2 - To test for consequences of an exposure of brain cells to copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs), we synthesised and characterised dimercaptosuccinate-coated CuO-NPs. These particles had a diameter of around 5 nm as determined by transmission electron microscopy, while their average hydrodynamic diameter in aqueous dispersion was 136 ± 4 nm. Dispersion in cell-culture medium containing 10% fetal calf serum increased the hydrodynamic diameter to 178 ± 12 nm and shifted the zeta potential of the particles from -49 ± 7 mV (in water) to -10 ± 3 mV. Exposure of cultured primary brain astrocytes to CuO-NPs increased the cellular copper levels and compromised the cell viability in a time-, concentration- and temperature-dependent manner. Application of CuO-NPs in concentrations above 100 µM copper (6.4 µg/ml) severely compromised the viability of the cells, as demonstrated by a lowered 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction capacity, a lowered cellular lactate dehydrogenase activity and an increased membrane permeability for the fluorescent dye propidium iodide. Copper internalisation as well as cell toxicity of astrocytes exposed to CuO-NPs were similar to that observed for cells that had been incubated with copper salts. The CuO-NP-induced toxicity was accompanied by an increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells. Both, ROS formation and cell toxicity in CuO-NP-treated astrocytes, were lowered in the presence of the cell-permeable copper chelator tetrathiomolybdate. These data demonstrate that CuO-NPs are taken up by cultured astrocytes and suggest that excess of internalised CuO-NPs cause cell toxicity by accelerating the formation of ROS. SN - 1743-5404 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23889294/Uptake_and_toxicity_of_copper_oxide_nanoparticles_in_cultured_primary_brain_astrocytes_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/17435390.2013.829591 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -