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Effects of music on physiological and behavioral responses of premature infants: a randomized controlled trial.
Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2013 Aug; 19(3):128-32.CT

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Despite persuasive theories about the beneficial effects of music and singing in developmental care for premature infants, few small studies are available in this regard. We conducted this study to investigate the physiological and behavioral responses of premature infants to recorded lullaby music and silence.

METHODS

In a randomized controlled trial, 90 premature infants in the neonatal care unit of a hospital in Qom (Iran) were randomly allocated to intervention (lullaby and silence) or control groups. Lullaby music was played via headphones at a volume of 50-60 dB. In the silence group, headphones were placed on the infants' ears while no music was played. The three groups were surveyed for physiological responses including oxygen saturation, respiratory and heart rates, and behavioral states every five minutes before, during, and after the intervention.

RESULTS

The three groups were not significantly different in terms of mean values of respiratory and heart rates, oxygen saturation, and behavioral states of infants. Similarly, no significant within group differences in respiratory and heart rates, oxygen saturation, and behavioral states were observed at different times.

CONCLUSION

Our findings did not support the beneficial effects of music for premature infants. However, music is a noninvasive, non-pharmaceutical, and relatively low-cost intervention that can be implemented at infants' bedside. Thus further research is warranted to determine whether the effects noted in previous studies can be consistently replicated in diverse settings and with diverse groups of preterm infants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23890458

Citation

Alipour, Zahra, et al. "Effects of Music On Physiological and Behavioral Responses of Premature Infants: a Randomized Controlled Trial." Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, vol. 19, no. 3, 2013, pp. 128-32.
Alipour Z, Eskandari N, Ahmari Tehran H, et al. Effects of music on physiological and behavioral responses of premature infants: a randomized controlled trial. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2013;19(3):128-32.
Alipour, Z., Eskandari, N., Ahmari Tehran, H., Eshagh Hossaini, S. K., & Sangi, S. (2013). Effects of music on physiological and behavioral responses of premature infants: a randomized controlled trial. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 19(3), 128-32. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2013.02.007
Alipour Z, et al. Effects of Music On Physiological and Behavioral Responses of Premature Infants: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2013;19(3):128-32. PubMed PMID: 23890458.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of music on physiological and behavioral responses of premature infants: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Alipour,Zahra, AU - Eskandari,Narges, AU - Ahmari Tehran,Hoda, AU - Eshagh Hossaini,Seyed Kamal, AU - Sangi,Sareh, Y1 - 2013/05/09/ PY - 2013/01/19/received PY - 2013/02/28/revised PY - 2013/02/28/accepted PY - 2013/7/30/entrez PY - 2013/7/31/pubmed PY - 2013/10/22/medline KW - Behavioral states KW - Complement therapy KW - Lullaby music KW - Neonatal intensive care unit KW - Physiological responses KW - Premature infant SP - 128 EP - 32 JF - Complementary therapies in clinical practice JO - Complement Ther Clin Pract VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Despite persuasive theories about the beneficial effects of music and singing in developmental care for premature infants, few small studies are available in this regard. We conducted this study to investigate the physiological and behavioral responses of premature infants to recorded lullaby music and silence. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial, 90 premature infants in the neonatal care unit of a hospital in Qom (Iran) were randomly allocated to intervention (lullaby and silence) or control groups. Lullaby music was played via headphones at a volume of 50-60 dB. In the silence group, headphones were placed on the infants' ears while no music was played. The three groups were surveyed for physiological responses including oxygen saturation, respiratory and heart rates, and behavioral states every five minutes before, during, and after the intervention. RESULTS: The three groups were not significantly different in terms of mean values of respiratory and heart rates, oxygen saturation, and behavioral states of infants. Similarly, no significant within group differences in respiratory and heart rates, oxygen saturation, and behavioral states were observed at different times. CONCLUSION: Our findings did not support the beneficial effects of music for premature infants. However, music is a noninvasive, non-pharmaceutical, and relatively low-cost intervention that can be implemented at infants' bedside. Thus further research is warranted to determine whether the effects noted in previous studies can be consistently replicated in diverse settings and with diverse groups of preterm infants. SN - 1873-6947 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23890458/Effects_of_music_on_physiological_and_behavioral_responses_of_premature_infants:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1744-3881(13)00020-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -