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Constipation and a low-fiber diet are not associated with diverticulosis.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2013; 11(12):1622-7CG

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Asymptomatic diverticulosis is commonly attributed to constipation caused by a low-fiber diet, although evidence for this mechanism is limited. We examined the associations between constipation and low dietary fiber intake with risk of asymptomatic diverticulosis.

METHODS

We performed a cross-sectional study that analyzed data from 539 individuals with diverticulosis and 1569 without (controls). Participants underwent colonoscopy and assessment of diet, physical activity, and bowel habits. Our analysis was limited to participants with no knowledge of their diverticular disease to reduce the risk of biased responses.

RESULTS

Constipation was not associated with an increased risk of diverticulosis. Participants with less frequent bowel movements (<7/wk) had reduced odds of diverticulosis compared with those with regular bowel movements (7/wk) (odds ratio [OR], 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.80). Those reporting hard stools also had reduced odds (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.55-1.02). There was no association between diverticulosis and straining (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.59-1.22) or incomplete bowel movement (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.61-1.20). We found no association between dietary fiber intake and diverticulosis (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.71-1.30) in comparing the highest quartile with the lowest (mean intake, 25 vs 8 g/day).

CONCLUSIONS

In our cross-sectional, colonoscopy-based study, neither constipation nor a low-fiber diet was associated with an increased risk of diverticulosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Electronic address: anne_peery@med.unc.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23891924

Citation

Peery, Anne F., et al. "Constipation and a Low-fiber Diet Are Not Associated With Diverticulosis." Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, vol. 11, no. 12, 2013, pp. 1622-7.
Peery AF, Sandler RS, Ahnen DJ, et al. Constipation and a low-fiber diet are not associated with diverticulosis. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013;11(12):1622-7.
Peery, A. F., Sandler, R. S., Ahnen, D. J., Galanko, J. A., Holm, A. N., Shaukat, A., ... Baron, J. A. (2013). Constipation and a low-fiber diet are not associated with diverticulosis. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, 11(12), pp. 1622-7. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2013.06.033.
Peery AF, et al. Constipation and a Low-fiber Diet Are Not Associated With Diverticulosis. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013;11(12):1622-7. PubMed PMID: 23891924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Constipation and a low-fiber diet are not associated with diverticulosis. AU - Peery,Anne F, AU - Sandler,Robert S, AU - Ahnen,Dennis J, AU - Galanko,Joseph A, AU - Holm,Adrian N, AU - Shaukat,Aasma, AU - Mott,Leila A, AU - Barry,Elizabeth L, AU - Fried,David A, AU - Baron,John A, Y1 - 2013/07/23/ PY - 2013/04/05/received PY - 2013/06/05/revised PY - 2013/06/28/accepted PY - 2013/7/30/entrez PY - 2013/7/31/pubmed PY - 2014/7/8/medline KW - BMI KW - CI KW - Database Analysis KW - Diverticular Disease KW - NSAID KW - OR KW - Risk Factors KW - body mass index KW - confidence interval KW - nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug KW - odds ratio SP - 1622 EP - 7 JF - Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association JO - Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. VL - 11 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Asymptomatic diverticulosis is commonly attributed to constipation caused by a low-fiber diet, although evidence for this mechanism is limited. We examined the associations between constipation and low dietary fiber intake with risk of asymptomatic diverticulosis. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study that analyzed data from 539 individuals with diverticulosis and 1569 without (controls). Participants underwent colonoscopy and assessment of diet, physical activity, and bowel habits. Our analysis was limited to participants with no knowledge of their diverticular disease to reduce the risk of biased responses. RESULTS: Constipation was not associated with an increased risk of diverticulosis. Participants with less frequent bowel movements (<7/wk) had reduced odds of diverticulosis compared with those with regular bowel movements (7/wk) (odds ratio [OR], 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.80). Those reporting hard stools also had reduced odds (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.55-1.02). There was no association between diverticulosis and straining (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.59-1.22) or incomplete bowel movement (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.61-1.20). We found no association between dietary fiber intake and diverticulosis (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.71-1.30) in comparing the highest quartile with the lowest (mean intake, 25 vs 8 g/day). CONCLUSIONS: In our cross-sectional, colonoscopy-based study, neither constipation nor a low-fiber diet was associated with an increased risk of diverticulosis. SN - 1542-7714 UR - http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23891924/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1542-3565(13)01056-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -