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Velocity- and power-load relationships of the bench pull vs. bench press exercises.
Int J Sports Med. 2014 Mar; 35(3):209-16.IJ

Abstract

This study compared the velocity- and power-load relationships of the antagonistic upper-body exercises of prone bench pull (PBP) and bench press (BP). 75 resistance-trained athletes performed a progressive loading test in each exercise up to the one-repetition maximum (1RM) in random order. Velocity and power output across the 30-100% 1RM were significantly higher for PBP, whereas 1RM strength was greater for BP. A very close relationship was observed between relative load and mean propulsive velocity for both BP (R2=0.97) and PBP (R2=0.94) which enables us to estimate %1RM from velocity using the obtained prediction equations. Important differences in the load that maximizes power output (Pmax) and the power profiles of both exercises were found according to the outcome variable used: mean (MP), peak (PP) or mean propulsive power (MPP). When MP was considered, the Pmax load was higher (56% BP, 70% PBP) than when PP (37% BP, 41% PBP) or MPP (37% BP, 46% PBP) were used. For each variable there was a broad range of loads at which power output was not significantly different. The differing velocity- and power-load relationships between PBP and BP seem attributable to the distinct muscle architecture and moment arm levers involved in these exercises.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Studies, Research and Sports Medicine Centre, Instituto Navarro de Deporte y Juventud (INDJ), Pamplona, Spain.Faculty of Sport, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain.Sports Medicine Centre, University of Murcia, Spain.Exercise Physiology Laboratory, University of Castilla La Mancha, Toledo, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23900903

Citation

Sánchez-Medina, L, et al. "Velocity- and Power-load Relationships of the Bench Pull Vs. Bench Press Exercises." International Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 35, no. 3, 2014, pp. 209-16.
Sánchez-Medina L, González-Badillo JJ, Pérez CE, et al. Velocity- and power-load relationships of the bench pull vs. bench press exercises. Int J Sports Med. 2014;35(3):209-16.
Sánchez-Medina, L., González-Badillo, J. J., Pérez, C. E., & Pallarés, J. G. (2014). Velocity- and power-load relationships of the bench pull vs. bench press exercises. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 35(3), 209-16. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1351252
Sánchez-Medina L, et al. Velocity- and Power-load Relationships of the Bench Pull Vs. Bench Press Exercises. Int J Sports Med. 2014;35(3):209-16. PubMed PMID: 23900903.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Velocity- and power-load relationships of the bench pull vs. bench press exercises. AU - Sánchez-Medina,L, AU - González-Badillo,J J, AU - Pérez,C E, AU - Pallarés,J G, Y1 - 2013/07/30/ PY - 2013/8/1/entrez PY - 2013/8/1/pubmed PY - 2014/10/10/medline SP - 209 EP - 16 JF - International journal of sports medicine JO - Int J Sports Med VL - 35 IS - 3 N2 - This study compared the velocity- and power-load relationships of the antagonistic upper-body exercises of prone bench pull (PBP) and bench press (BP). 75 resistance-trained athletes performed a progressive loading test in each exercise up to the one-repetition maximum (1RM) in random order. Velocity and power output across the 30-100% 1RM were significantly higher for PBP, whereas 1RM strength was greater for BP. A very close relationship was observed between relative load and mean propulsive velocity for both BP (R2=0.97) and PBP (R2=0.94) which enables us to estimate %1RM from velocity using the obtained prediction equations. Important differences in the load that maximizes power output (Pmax) and the power profiles of both exercises were found according to the outcome variable used: mean (MP), peak (PP) or mean propulsive power (MPP). When MP was considered, the Pmax load was higher (56% BP, 70% PBP) than when PP (37% BP, 41% PBP) or MPP (37% BP, 46% PBP) were used. For each variable there was a broad range of loads at which power output was not significantly different. The differing velocity- and power-load relationships between PBP and BP seem attributable to the distinct muscle architecture and moment arm levers involved in these exercises. SN - 1439-3964 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23900903/Velocity__and_power_load_relationships_of_the_bench_pull_vs__bench_press_exercises_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0033-1351252 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -