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Angiostrongylus cantonensis and rat lungworm disease in Brazil.
Hawaii J Med Public Health. 2013 Jun; 72(6 Suppl 2):18-22.HJ

Abstract

The metastrongyloid nematode genus Angiostrongylus includes 18 species, two of which are relevant from a medical standpoint, Angiostrongylus costaricensis and Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The first was described from Costa Rica in 1971 and causes abdominal angiostrongyliasis in the Americas, including in Brazil. Angiostrongylus cantonensis, first described in 1935 from Canton, China, is the causative agent of eosinophilic meningitis. The natural definitive hosts are rodents, and molluscs are the intermediate hosts. Paratenic or carrier hosts include crabs, freshwater shrimp, amphibians, flatworms, and fish. Humans become infected accidentally by ingestion of intermediate or paratenic hosts and the parasite does not complete the life cycle as it does in rats. Worms in the brain cause eosinophilic meningitis. This zoonosis, widespread in Southeast Asia and the Pacific islands, has now been reported from other regions. In the Americas there are records from the United States, Cuba, Jamaica, Brazil, Ecuador, and Haiti. In Brazil seven human cases have been reported since 2007 from the southeastern and northeastern regions. Epidemiological studies found infected specimens of Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus as well as many species of molluscs, including the giant African land snail, Achatina fulica, from various regions of Brazil. The spread of angiostrongyliasis is currently a matter of concern in Brazil.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratório de Malacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. sthiengo@ioc.fiocruz.brNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23901376

Citation

Thiengo, Silvana Carvalho, et al. "Angiostrongylus Cantonensis and Rat Lungworm Disease in Brazil." Hawai'i Journal of Medicine & Public Health : a Journal of Asia Pacific Medicine & Public Health, vol. 72, no. 6 Suppl 2, 2013, pp. 18-22.
Thiengo SC, Simões Rde O, Fernandez MA, et al. Angiostrongylus cantonensis and rat lungworm disease in Brazil. Hawaii J Med Public Health. 2013;72(6 Suppl 2):18-22.
Thiengo, S. C., Simões, R. d. e. . O., Fernandez, M. A., & Maldonado, A. (2013). Angiostrongylus cantonensis and rat lungworm disease in Brazil. Hawai'i Journal of Medicine & Public Health : a Journal of Asia Pacific Medicine & Public Health, 72(6 Suppl 2), 18-22.
Thiengo SC, et al. Angiostrongylus Cantonensis and Rat Lungworm Disease in Brazil. Hawaii J Med Public Health. 2013;72(6 Suppl 2):18-22. PubMed PMID: 23901376.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Angiostrongylus cantonensis and rat lungworm disease in Brazil. AU - Thiengo,Silvana Carvalho, AU - Simões,Raquel de Oliveira, AU - Fernandez,Monica Ammon, AU - Maldonado,Arnaldo,Jr PY - 2013/8/1/entrez PY - 2013/8/2/pubmed PY - 2014/5/23/medline KW - Achatina fulica KW - Angiostrongyliasis KW - Brazil KW - Eosinophilic meningitis KW - Rattus norvegicus KW - Rattus rattus KW - Snails SP - 18 EP - 22 JF - Hawai'i journal of medicine & public health : a journal of Asia Pacific Medicine & Public Health JO - Hawaii J Med Public Health VL - 72 IS - 6 Suppl 2 N2 - The metastrongyloid nematode genus Angiostrongylus includes 18 species, two of which are relevant from a medical standpoint, Angiostrongylus costaricensis and Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The first was described from Costa Rica in 1971 and causes abdominal angiostrongyliasis in the Americas, including in Brazil. Angiostrongylus cantonensis, first described in 1935 from Canton, China, is the causative agent of eosinophilic meningitis. The natural definitive hosts are rodents, and molluscs are the intermediate hosts. Paratenic or carrier hosts include crabs, freshwater shrimp, amphibians, flatworms, and fish. Humans become infected accidentally by ingestion of intermediate or paratenic hosts and the parasite does not complete the life cycle as it does in rats. Worms in the brain cause eosinophilic meningitis. This zoonosis, widespread in Southeast Asia and the Pacific islands, has now been reported from other regions. In the Americas there are records from the United States, Cuba, Jamaica, Brazil, Ecuador, and Haiti. In Brazil seven human cases have been reported since 2007 from the southeastern and northeastern regions. Epidemiological studies found infected specimens of Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus as well as many species of molluscs, including the giant African land snail, Achatina fulica, from various regions of Brazil. The spread of angiostrongyliasis is currently a matter of concern in Brazil. SN - 2165-8242 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23901376/Angiostrongylus_cantonensis_and_rat_lungworm_disease_in_Brazil_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/23901376/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -