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Masters athletes exhibit larger regional brain volume and better cognitive performance than sedentary older adults.
J Magn Reson Imaging. 2013 Nov; 38(5):1169-76.JM

Abstract

PURPOSE

To investigate differences in the age-related decline in brain tissue concentration between Masters athletes and sedentary older adults.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Twelve Masters athletes (MA) (three females, age = 72.4 ± 5.6 years, endurance training >15 years), 12 sedentary elderly (SE) similar in age and educational level (four females, age = 74.6 ± 4.3 years), and nine young controls (YC) (four females, age = 27.2 ± 3.6 years) participated. T1-weighted high-resolution (1 × 1 × 1mm(3)) images were acquired. Voxel-based analysis was conducted to identify clusters showing tissue concentration differences with t-tests. Cognitive function was assessed using a standard clinical battery focused on executive function and memory.

RESULTS

Two MA and two SE were unable to complete the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. Both SE and MA showed lower gray matter (GM) concentrations than YC in the superior, inferior and middle frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, postcentral gyrus, and the cingulate gyrus (PFDR-corrected < 0.001) and lower white matter (WM) concentrations in the inferior frontal gyrus and precentral gyrus (PFDR-corrected < 0.005). Notably, MA showed higher GM and WM concentrations than SE in the subgyral, cuneus, and precuneus regions related to visuospatial function, motor control, and working memory (PFDR-corrected < 0.005). After controlling for estimated intelligence, MA outperformed SE on tasks of letter (P < 0.01) and category (P < 0.05) fluency.

CONCLUSION

Life-long exercise may confer benefits to some aspects of executive function and age-related brain tissue loss in the regions related to visuospatial function, motor control, and working memory in older adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, Dallas, Texas, USA; Department of Internal Medicine-Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23908143

Citation

Tseng, Benjamin Y., et al. "Masters Athletes Exhibit Larger Regional Brain Volume and Better Cognitive Performance Than Sedentary Older Adults." Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging : JMRI, vol. 38, no. 5, 2013, pp. 1169-76.
Tseng BY, Uh J, Rossetti HC, et al. Masters athletes exhibit larger regional brain volume and better cognitive performance than sedentary older adults. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2013;38(5):1169-76.
Tseng, B. Y., Uh, J., Rossetti, H. C., Cullum, C. M., Diaz-Arrastia, R. F., Levine, B. D., Lu, H., & Zhang, R. (2013). Masters athletes exhibit larger regional brain volume and better cognitive performance than sedentary older adults. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging : JMRI, 38(5), 1169-76. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmri.24085
Tseng BY, et al. Masters Athletes Exhibit Larger Regional Brain Volume and Better Cognitive Performance Than Sedentary Older Adults. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2013;38(5):1169-76. PubMed PMID: 23908143.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Masters athletes exhibit larger regional brain volume and better cognitive performance than sedentary older adults. AU - Tseng,Benjamin Y, AU - Uh,Jinsoo, AU - Rossetti,Heidi C, AU - Cullum,C Munro, AU - Diaz-Arrastia,Ramon F, AU - Levine,Benjamin D, AU - Lu,Hanzhang, AU - Zhang,Rong, Y1 - 2013/03/21/ PY - 2012/03/19/received PY - 2013/01/25/accepted PY - 2013/8/3/entrez PY - 2013/8/3/pubmed PY - 2014/6/6/medline KW - MRI KW - aging KW - brain KW - cognition KW - exercise SP - 1169 EP - 76 JF - Journal of magnetic resonance imaging : JMRI JO - J Magn Reson Imaging VL - 38 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate differences in the age-related decline in brain tissue concentration between Masters athletes and sedentary older adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve Masters athletes (MA) (three females, age = 72.4 ± 5.6 years, endurance training >15 years), 12 sedentary elderly (SE) similar in age and educational level (four females, age = 74.6 ± 4.3 years), and nine young controls (YC) (four females, age = 27.2 ± 3.6 years) participated. T1-weighted high-resolution (1 × 1 × 1mm(3)) images were acquired. Voxel-based analysis was conducted to identify clusters showing tissue concentration differences with t-tests. Cognitive function was assessed using a standard clinical battery focused on executive function and memory. RESULTS: Two MA and two SE were unable to complete the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. Both SE and MA showed lower gray matter (GM) concentrations than YC in the superior, inferior and middle frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, postcentral gyrus, and the cingulate gyrus (PFDR-corrected < 0.001) and lower white matter (WM) concentrations in the inferior frontal gyrus and precentral gyrus (PFDR-corrected < 0.005). Notably, MA showed higher GM and WM concentrations than SE in the subgyral, cuneus, and precuneus regions related to visuospatial function, motor control, and working memory (PFDR-corrected < 0.005). After controlling for estimated intelligence, MA outperformed SE on tasks of letter (P < 0.01) and category (P < 0.05) fluency. CONCLUSION: Life-long exercise may confer benefits to some aspects of executive function and age-related brain tissue loss in the regions related to visuospatial function, motor control, and working memory in older adults. SN - 1522-2586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23908143/Masters_athletes_exhibit_larger_regional_brain_volume_and_better_cognitive_performance_than_sedentary_older_adults_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jmri.24085 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -