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Do different fairness contexts and facial emotions motivate 'irrational' social decision-making in major depression? An exploratory patient study.
Psychiatry Res. 2013 Dec 15; 210(2):438-43.PR

Abstract

Although 'irrational' decision-making has been linked to depression, the contribution of biases in information processing to these findings remains unknown. To investigate the impact of cognitive biases and aberrant processing of facial emotions on social decision-making, we manipulated both context-related and emotion-related information in a modified Ultimatum Game. Unfair offers were (1) paired with different unselected alternatives, establishing the context in which an offer was made, and (2) accompanied by emotional facial expressions of proposers. Responder behavior was assessed in patients with major depressive disorder and healthy controls. In both groups alike, rejection rates were highest following unambiguous signals of unfairness, i.e. an angry proposer face or when an unfair distribution had deliberately been chosen over an equal split. However, depressed patients showed overall higher rejection rates than healthy volunteers, without exhibiting differential processing biases. This suggests that depressed patients were, as healthy individuals, basing their decisions on informative, salient features and differentiating between (i) fair and unfair offers, (ii) alternatives to unfair offers and (iii) proposers' facial emotions. Although more fundamental processes, e.g. reduced reward sensitivity, might underlie increased rejection in depression, the current study provides insight into mechanisms that shape fairness considerations in both depressed and healthy individuals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, The Netherlands. Electronic address: s.radke@donders.ru.nl.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23910237

Citation

Radke, Sina, et al. "Do Different Fairness Contexts and Facial Emotions Motivate 'irrational' Social Decision-making in Major Depression? an Exploratory Patient Study." Psychiatry Research, vol. 210, no. 2, 2013, pp. 438-43.
Radke S, Schäfer IC, Müller BW, et al. Do different fairness contexts and facial emotions motivate 'irrational' social decision-making in major depression? An exploratory patient study. Psychiatry Res. 2013;210(2):438-43.
Radke, S., Schäfer, I. C., Müller, B. W., & de Bruijn, E. R. (2013). Do different fairness contexts and facial emotions motivate 'irrational' social decision-making in major depression? An exploratory patient study. Psychiatry Research, 210(2), 438-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2013.07.017
Radke S, et al. Do Different Fairness Contexts and Facial Emotions Motivate 'irrational' Social Decision-making in Major Depression? an Exploratory Patient Study. Psychiatry Res. 2013 Dec 15;210(2):438-43. PubMed PMID: 23910237.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do different fairness contexts and facial emotions motivate 'irrational' social decision-making in major depression? An exploratory patient study. AU - Radke,Sina, AU - Schäfer,Ina C, AU - Müller,Bernhard W, AU - de Bruijn,Ellen R A, Y1 - 2013/07/30/ PY - 2012/12/06/received PY - 2013/07/06/revised PY - 2013/07/09/accepted PY - 2013/8/6/entrez PY - 2013/8/6/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline KW - Depression KW - Facial emotion KW - Fairness KW - Social decision-making KW - Ultimatum game SP - 438 EP - 43 JF - Psychiatry research JO - Psychiatry Res VL - 210 IS - 2 N2 - Although 'irrational' decision-making has been linked to depression, the contribution of biases in information processing to these findings remains unknown. To investigate the impact of cognitive biases and aberrant processing of facial emotions on social decision-making, we manipulated both context-related and emotion-related information in a modified Ultimatum Game. Unfair offers were (1) paired with different unselected alternatives, establishing the context in which an offer was made, and (2) accompanied by emotional facial expressions of proposers. Responder behavior was assessed in patients with major depressive disorder and healthy controls. In both groups alike, rejection rates were highest following unambiguous signals of unfairness, i.e. an angry proposer face or when an unfair distribution had deliberately been chosen over an equal split. However, depressed patients showed overall higher rejection rates than healthy volunteers, without exhibiting differential processing biases. This suggests that depressed patients were, as healthy individuals, basing their decisions on informative, salient features and differentiating between (i) fair and unfair offers, (ii) alternatives to unfair offers and (iii) proposers' facial emotions. Although more fundamental processes, e.g. reduced reward sensitivity, might underlie increased rejection in depression, the current study provides insight into mechanisms that shape fairness considerations in both depressed and healthy individuals. SN - 1872-7123 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23910237/Do_different_fairness_contexts_and_facial_emotions_motivate_'irrational'_social_decision_making_in_major_depression_An_exploratory_patient_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-1781(13)00392-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -