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Prenatal bisphenol A and birth outcomes: MOCEH (Mothers and Children's Environmental Health) study.
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2014 Mar; 217(2-3):328-34.IJ

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is used primarily in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Widespread exposure to BPA has created a great deal of concern regarding its potential adverse effects on human health. This study examined the relationship between prenatal BPA exposure and birth outcomes, including birth weight, birth length, and ponderal index considering gender difference. A multi-center birth cohort study, Mothers and Children's Environmental Health (MOCEH) has been established in Korea since 2006. Study subjects are 757 pregnant women from the original cohort, who had their urinary BPA level measured during the third trimester, as well as information on birth outcome, prior medical history, psychosocial status, health behavior, environmental exposure as well as socio-demographic characteristics. Regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of BPA on birth outcome. The geometric mean concentration of BPA in pregnant women was 1.29 μg/L (1.87 μg/g creatinine) during late pregnancy. Urinary BPA concentrations were shown to be higher in women with a higher income level. Univariate regression analysis revealed a significant association between BPA levels and birth weight. In adjusted analysis, the second tertile of maternal BPA exposure exhibited an increase in birth weight, relative to the first tertile (p=0.04). These relationships were more pronounced in male neonates. Also, prenatal exposure to BPA was associated with an increase of ponderal index in total, and especially female neonates. This study shows that the association of prenatal exposure to BPA with anthropometric measures, such as birth weight and birth length, differed by gender. Further study is required to more fully elaborate this relationship between prenatal BPA exposure and birth outcome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Environmental Health Research Division, National Institute of Environmental Research, Incheon, Republic of Korea; Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Preventive Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Republic of Korea.Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Republic of Korea.Department of Nutritional Science and Food Management, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Institute of Human Behavioral Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Environmental Health Research Division, National Institute of Environmental Research, Incheon, Republic of Korea.Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: eunheeha@ewha.ac.kr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23911140

Citation

Lee, Bo-Eun, et al. "Prenatal Bisphenol a and Birth Outcomes: MOCEH (Mothers and Children's Environmental Health) Study." International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, vol. 217, no. 2-3, 2014, pp. 328-34.
Lee BE, Park H, Hong YC, et al. Prenatal bisphenol A and birth outcomes: MOCEH (Mothers and Children's Environmental Health) study. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2014;217(2-3):328-34.
Lee, B. E., Park, H., Hong, Y. C., Ha, M., Kim, Y., Chang, N., Kim, B. N., Kim, Y. J., Yu, S. D., & Ha, E. H. (2014). Prenatal bisphenol A and birth outcomes: MOCEH (Mothers and Children's Environmental Health) study. International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, 217(2-3), 328-34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheh.2013.07.005
Lee BE, et al. Prenatal Bisphenol a and Birth Outcomes: MOCEH (Mothers and Children's Environmental Health) Study. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2014;217(2-3):328-34. PubMed PMID: 23911140.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal bisphenol A and birth outcomes: MOCEH (Mothers and Children's Environmental Health) study. AU - Lee,Bo-Eun, AU - Park,Hyesook, AU - Hong,Yun-Chul, AU - Ha,Mina, AU - Kim,Yangho, AU - Chang,Namsoo, AU - Kim,Boong-Nyun, AU - Kim,Young Ju, AU - Yu,Seung-Do, AU - Ha,Eun-Hee, Y1 - 2013/07/11/ PY - 2012/12/28/received PY - 2013/07/01/revised PY - 2013/07/03/accepted PY - 2013/8/6/entrez PY - 2013/8/6/pubmed PY - 2014/9/12/medline KW - BMI KW - BPA KW - Birth weight KW - Bisphenol A KW - Cr KW - Endocrine disruptors KW - Fetal development KW - GM KW - LOD KW - MOCEH KW - Mothers and Children's Environmental Health KW - OR KW - Pregnancy KW - UGT KW - bisphenol A KW - body mass index KW - creatinine KW - geometric mean KW - limits of detection KW - odds ratio KW - uridine diphosphate–glucoronosyl transferase SP - 328 EP - 34 JF - International journal of hygiene and environmental health JO - Int J Hyg Environ Health VL - 217 IS - 2-3 N2 - Bisphenol A (BPA) is used primarily in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Widespread exposure to BPA has created a great deal of concern regarding its potential adverse effects on human health. This study examined the relationship between prenatal BPA exposure and birth outcomes, including birth weight, birth length, and ponderal index considering gender difference. A multi-center birth cohort study, Mothers and Children's Environmental Health (MOCEH) has been established in Korea since 2006. Study subjects are 757 pregnant women from the original cohort, who had their urinary BPA level measured during the third trimester, as well as information on birth outcome, prior medical history, psychosocial status, health behavior, environmental exposure as well as socio-demographic characteristics. Regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of BPA on birth outcome. The geometric mean concentration of BPA in pregnant women was 1.29 μg/L (1.87 μg/g creatinine) during late pregnancy. Urinary BPA concentrations were shown to be higher in women with a higher income level. Univariate regression analysis revealed a significant association between BPA levels and birth weight. In adjusted analysis, the second tertile of maternal BPA exposure exhibited an increase in birth weight, relative to the first tertile (p=0.04). These relationships were more pronounced in male neonates. Also, prenatal exposure to BPA was associated with an increase of ponderal index in total, and especially female neonates. This study shows that the association of prenatal exposure to BPA with anthropometric measures, such as birth weight and birth length, differed by gender. Further study is required to more fully elaborate this relationship between prenatal BPA exposure and birth outcome. SN - 1618-131X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23911140/Prenatal_bisphenol_A_and_birth_outcomes:_MOCEH__Mothers_and_Children's_Environmental_Health__study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1438-4639(13)00099-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -