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Nutrient intake and peripheral artery disease in adults: key considerations in cross-sectional studies.
Clin Nutr. 2014 Jun; 33(3):443-7.CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

There are limited studies of nutrient intake and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Some studies have not accounted for the functional consequences of PAD, potentially leading to biased results. To determine the associations between intakes of dietary fiber, folate, vitamins A, C, E, and B6 and PAD.

METHODS

Cross-sectional analysis of 6534 adults aged 40 years and older in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2004, including measurement of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and nutrient intake by 24-h dietary recall. Weighted multivariable logistic regression models to determine odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS

The prevalence of PAD (ABI < 0.9) was 5.3% (4.7-5.9). Inverse associations between PAD and intakes of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, B6, C, and E were statistically significant when adjusting for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes and smoking. In models further adjusted for energy intake and physical activity, these odds ratios all became null (p ≥ 0.1).

CONCLUSIONS

In this sample, dietary fiber, folate, and vitamins B6, C, and E were not associated with PAD after accounting for energy intake and activity. Adjustment for energy and physical activity are essential to avoid bias due to reverse causation in cross-sectional studies of diet and PAD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. Electronic address: asghar_naqvi@hms.harvard.edu.Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. Electronic address: davis@hsph.harvard.edu.Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. Electronic address: kmukamal@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23920500

Citation

Naqvi, Asghar Z., et al. "Nutrient Intake and Peripheral Artery Disease in Adults: Key Considerations in Cross-sectional Studies." Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), vol. 33, no. 3, 2014, pp. 443-7.
Naqvi AZ, Davis RB, Mukamal KJ. Nutrient intake and peripheral artery disease in adults: key considerations in cross-sectional studies. Clin Nutr. 2014;33(3):443-7.
Naqvi, A. Z., Davis, R. B., & Mukamal, K. J. (2014). Nutrient intake and peripheral artery disease in adults: key considerations in cross-sectional studies. Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), 33(3), 443-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2013.06.011
Naqvi AZ, Davis RB, Mukamal KJ. Nutrient Intake and Peripheral Artery Disease in Adults: Key Considerations in Cross-sectional Studies. Clin Nutr. 2014;33(3):443-7. PubMed PMID: 23920500.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrient intake and peripheral artery disease in adults: key considerations in cross-sectional studies. AU - Naqvi,Asghar Z, AU - Davis,Roger B, AU - Mukamal,Kenneth J, Y1 - 2013/07/03/ PY - 2013/01/26/received PY - 2013/05/13/revised PY - 2013/06/17/accepted PY - 2013/8/8/entrez PY - 2013/8/8/pubmed PY - 2014/12/23/medline KW - Activity KW - Cross-sectional KW - Diet KW - Energy KW - Nutrients KW - Peripheral artery disease SP - 443 EP - 7 JF - Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) JO - Clin Nutr VL - 33 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: There are limited studies of nutrient intake and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Some studies have not accounted for the functional consequences of PAD, potentially leading to biased results. To determine the associations between intakes of dietary fiber, folate, vitamins A, C, E, and B6 and PAD. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of 6534 adults aged 40 years and older in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2004, including measurement of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and nutrient intake by 24-h dietary recall. Weighted multivariable logistic regression models to determine odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The prevalence of PAD (ABI < 0.9) was 5.3% (4.7-5.9). Inverse associations between PAD and intakes of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, B6, C, and E were statistically significant when adjusting for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes and smoking. In models further adjusted for energy intake and physical activity, these odds ratios all became null (p ≥ 0.1). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, dietary fiber, folate, and vitamins B6, C, and E were not associated with PAD after accounting for energy intake and activity. Adjustment for energy and physical activity are essential to avoid bias due to reverse causation in cross-sectional studies of diet and PAD. SN - 1532-1983 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23920500/Nutrient_intake_and_peripheral_artery_disease_in_adults:_key_considerations_in_cross_sectional_studies_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0261-5614(13)00183-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -