Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Comparison of predictive equations and measured resting energy expenditure among obese youth attending a pediatric healthy weight clinic: one size does not fit all.
Nutr Clin Pract 2013; 28(5):617-24NC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends the use of indirect calorimetry for calculating caloric targets for weight loss in obese youth. Practitioners typically use predictive equations since indirect calorimetry is often not available. The objective of this study was to compare measured resting energy expenditure (MREE) with that estimated using published predictive equations in obese pediatric patients.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Youth aged 7 to 18 years (n = 80) who were referred to a university-based healthy weight clinic and who were greater than the 95th percentile BMI for age and gender participated. MREE was measured via a portable indirect calorimeter. Predicted energy expenditure (pEE) was estimated using published equations including those commonly used in children. pEE was compared to the MREE for each subject. Absolute mean difference between MREE and pEE, mean percentage accuracy, and mean error were determined.

RESULTS

Mean percentage accuracy of pEE compared with MREE varied widely, with the Harris-Benedict, Lazzer, and Molnar equations providing the greatest accuracy (65%, 61%, and 60%, respectively). Mean differences between MREE and equation-estimated caloric targets varied from 197.9 kcal/day to 307.7 kcal/day.

CONCLUSIONS

The potential to either overestimate or underestimate calorie needs in the clinical setting is significant when comparing EE derived from predictive equations with that measured using portable indirect calorimetry. While our findings suggest that the Harris-Benedict equation has improved accuracy relative to other equations in severely obese youth, the potential for error remains sufficiently great to suggest that indirect calorimetry is preferred.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sarah T. Henes, The Division of Nutrition, Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions, Georgia State University, PO Box 3995, Atlanta, GA 30302, USA. Email: shenes@gsu.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23921297

Citation

Henes, Sarah T., et al. "Comparison of Predictive Equations and Measured Resting Energy Expenditure Among Obese Youth Attending a Pediatric Healthy Weight Clinic: One Size Does Not Fit All." Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 28, no. 5, 2013, pp. 617-24.
Henes ST, Cummings DM, Hickner RC, et al. Comparison of predictive equations and measured resting energy expenditure among obese youth attending a pediatric healthy weight clinic: one size does not fit all. Nutr Clin Pract. 2013;28(5):617-24.
Henes, S. T., Cummings, D. M., Hickner, R. C., Houmard, J. A., Kolasa, K. M., Lazorick, S., & Collier, D. N. (2013). Comparison of predictive equations and measured resting energy expenditure among obese youth attending a pediatric healthy weight clinic: one size does not fit all. Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 28(5), pp. 617-24. doi:10.1177/0884533613497237.
Henes ST, et al. Comparison of Predictive Equations and Measured Resting Energy Expenditure Among Obese Youth Attending a Pediatric Healthy Weight Clinic: One Size Does Not Fit All. Nutr Clin Pract. 2013;28(5):617-24. PubMed PMID: 23921297.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of predictive equations and measured resting energy expenditure among obese youth attending a pediatric healthy weight clinic: one size does not fit all. AU - Henes,Sarah T, AU - Cummings,Doyle M, AU - Hickner,Robert C, AU - Houmard,Joseph A, AU - Kolasa,Kathryn M, AU - Lazorick,Suzanne, AU - Collier,David N, Y1 - 2013/08/06/ PY - 2013/8/8/entrez PY - 2013/8/8/pubmed PY - 2014/4/11/medline KW - childhood obesity KW - energy expenditure KW - indirect calorimeter KW - pediatric clinic KW - portable indirect calorimetry SP - 617 EP - 24 JF - Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition JO - Nutr Clin Pract VL - 28 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends the use of indirect calorimetry for calculating caloric targets for weight loss in obese youth. Practitioners typically use predictive equations since indirect calorimetry is often not available. The objective of this study was to compare measured resting energy expenditure (MREE) with that estimated using published predictive equations in obese pediatric patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Youth aged 7 to 18 years (n = 80) who were referred to a university-based healthy weight clinic and who were greater than the 95th percentile BMI for age and gender participated. MREE was measured via a portable indirect calorimeter. Predicted energy expenditure (pEE) was estimated using published equations including those commonly used in children. pEE was compared to the MREE for each subject. Absolute mean difference between MREE and pEE, mean percentage accuracy, and mean error were determined. RESULTS: Mean percentage accuracy of pEE compared with MREE varied widely, with the Harris-Benedict, Lazzer, and Molnar equations providing the greatest accuracy (65%, 61%, and 60%, respectively). Mean differences between MREE and equation-estimated caloric targets varied from 197.9 kcal/day to 307.7 kcal/day. CONCLUSIONS: The potential to either overestimate or underestimate calorie needs in the clinical setting is significant when comparing EE derived from predictive equations with that measured using portable indirect calorimetry. While our findings suggest that the Harris-Benedict equation has improved accuracy relative to other equations in severely obese youth, the potential for error remains sufficiently great to suggest that indirect calorimetry is preferred. SN - 1941-2452 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23921297/Comparison_of_predictive_equations_and_measured_resting_energy_expenditure_among_obese_youth_attending_a_pediatric_healthy_weight_clinic:_one_size_does_not_fit_all_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0884533613497237 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -