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Migraine and risk of dementia: a nationwide retrospective cohort study.
Neuroepidemiology. 2013; 41(3-4):139-45.N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Migraines are one of the most common neurological disorders. Dementia is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by slow progressive memory loss and cognitive dysfunction. This retrospective cohort study investigates the association between migraines and dementia using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan.

METHODS

We retrieved the data analyzed in this study from the National Health Insurance Research database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. We used multivariate Cox proportion-hazards regression models to assess the effects of migraines on the risk of dementia after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbidities.

RESULTS

The migraine cohort had a higher prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, head injury and depression at baseline (p < 0.0001). After adjusting the covariates, migraine patients had a 1.33-fold higher risk of developing dementia [hazard ratio (HR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-1.46]. The sex-specific incidence rate of dementia was higher in men than in women in both cohorts, with an HR of 1.09 (95% CI 1.00-1.18) for men compared to women. Kaplan-Meier analysis shows that the cumulative incidence of dementia was 1.48% greater in the migraine cohort than in the nonmigraine cohort (log-rank test, p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

This study shows that migraines are associated with a future higher risk of dementia after adjusting for comorbidities. Specifically, the association between migraine and dementia is greater in young adults than in older adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23921376

Citation

Chuang, Chieh-Sen, et al. "Migraine and Risk of Dementia: a Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study." Neuroepidemiology, vol. 41, no. 3-4, 2013, pp. 139-45.
Chuang CS, Lin CL, Lin MC, et al. Migraine and risk of dementia: a nationwide retrospective cohort study. Neuroepidemiology. 2013;41(3-4):139-45.
Chuang, C. S., Lin, C. L., Lin, M. C., Sung, F. C., & Kao, C. H. (2013). Migraine and risk of dementia: a nationwide retrospective cohort study. Neuroepidemiology, 41(3-4), 139-45. https://doi.org/10.1159/000353559
Chuang CS, et al. Migraine and Risk of Dementia: a Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study. Neuroepidemiology. 2013;41(3-4):139-45. PubMed PMID: 23921376.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Migraine and risk of dementia: a nationwide retrospective cohort study. AU - Chuang,Chieh-Sen, AU - Lin,Cheng-Li, AU - Lin,Ming-Chia, AU - Sung,Fung-Chang, AU - Kao,Chia-Hung, Y1 - 2013/07/30/ PY - 2013/04/23/received PY - 2013/05/28/accepted PY - 2013/8/8/entrez PY - 2013/8/8/pubmed PY - 2014/8/16/medline SP - 139 EP - 45 JF - Neuroepidemiology JO - Neuroepidemiology VL - 41 IS - 3-4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Migraines are one of the most common neurological disorders. Dementia is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by slow progressive memory loss and cognitive dysfunction. This retrospective cohort study investigates the association between migraines and dementia using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan. METHODS: We retrieved the data analyzed in this study from the National Health Insurance Research database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. We used multivariate Cox proportion-hazards regression models to assess the effects of migraines on the risk of dementia after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbidities. RESULTS: The migraine cohort had a higher prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, head injury and depression at baseline (p < 0.0001). After adjusting the covariates, migraine patients had a 1.33-fold higher risk of developing dementia [hazard ratio (HR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-1.46]. The sex-specific incidence rate of dementia was higher in men than in women in both cohorts, with an HR of 1.09 (95% CI 1.00-1.18) for men compared to women. Kaplan-Meier analysis shows that the cumulative incidence of dementia was 1.48% greater in the migraine cohort than in the nonmigraine cohort (log-rank test, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that migraines are associated with a future higher risk of dementia after adjusting for comorbidities. Specifically, the association between migraine and dementia is greater in young adults than in older adults. SN - 1423-0208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23921376/Migraine_and_risk_of_dementia:_a_nationwide_retrospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000353559 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -