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Sex-related preferences for real and doll faces versus real and toy objects in young infants and adults.
J Exp Child Psychol. 2013 Oct; 116(2):367-79.JE

Abstract

Findings of previous studies demonstrate sex-related preferences for toys in 6-month-old infants; boys prefer nonsocial or mechanical toys such as cars, whereas girls prefer social toys such as dolls. Here, we explored the innate versus learned nature of this sex-related preferences using multiple pictures of doll and real faces (of men and women) as well as pictures of toy and real objects (cars and stoves). In total, 48 4- and 5-month-old infants (24 girls and 24 boys) and 48 young adults (24 women and 24 men) saw six trials of all relevant pairs of faces and objects, with each trial containing a different exemplar of a stimulus type. The infant results showed no sex-related preferences; infants preferred faces of men and women regardless of whether they were real or doll faces. Similarly, adults did not show sex-related preferences for social versus nonsocial stimuli, but unlike infants they preferred faces of the opposite sex over objects. These results challenge claims of an innate basis for sex-related preferences for toy real stimuli and suggest that sex-related preferences result from maturational and social development that continues into adulthood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia. paola.escudero@uws.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23933180

Citation

Escudero, Paola, et al. "Sex-related Preferences for Real and Doll Faces Versus Real and Toy Objects in Young Infants and Adults." Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, vol. 116, no. 2, 2013, pp. 367-79.
Escudero P, Robbins RA, Johnson SP. Sex-related preferences for real and doll faces versus real and toy objects in young infants and adults. J Exp Child Psychol. 2013;116(2):367-79.
Escudero, P., Robbins, R. A., & Johnson, S. P. (2013). Sex-related preferences for real and doll faces versus real and toy objects in young infants and adults. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 116(2), 367-79. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2013.07.001
Escudero P, Robbins RA, Johnson SP. Sex-related Preferences for Real and Doll Faces Versus Real and Toy Objects in Young Infants and Adults. J Exp Child Psychol. 2013;116(2):367-79. PubMed PMID: 23933180.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex-related preferences for real and doll faces versus real and toy objects in young infants and adults. AU - Escudero,Paola, AU - Robbins,Rachel A, AU - Johnson,Scott P, Y1 - 2013/08/07/ PY - 2013/03/27/received PY - 2013/06/30/revised PY - 2013/07/02/accepted PY - 2013/8/13/entrez PY - 2013/8/13/pubmed PY - 2014/4/26/medline KW - Adults KW - Face preference KW - Faces KW - Infants KW - Real objects KW - Sex-related preferences KW - Toys SP - 367 EP - 79 JF - Journal of experimental child psychology JO - J Exp Child Psychol VL - 116 IS - 2 N2 - Findings of previous studies demonstrate sex-related preferences for toys in 6-month-old infants; boys prefer nonsocial or mechanical toys such as cars, whereas girls prefer social toys such as dolls. Here, we explored the innate versus learned nature of this sex-related preferences using multiple pictures of doll and real faces (of men and women) as well as pictures of toy and real objects (cars and stoves). In total, 48 4- and 5-month-old infants (24 girls and 24 boys) and 48 young adults (24 women and 24 men) saw six trials of all relevant pairs of faces and objects, with each trial containing a different exemplar of a stimulus type. The infant results showed no sex-related preferences; infants preferred faces of men and women regardless of whether they were real or doll faces. Similarly, adults did not show sex-related preferences for social versus nonsocial stimuli, but unlike infants they preferred faces of the opposite sex over objects. These results challenge claims of an innate basis for sex-related preferences for toy real stimuli and suggest that sex-related preferences result from maturational and social development that continues into adulthood. SN - 1096-0457 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23933180/Sex_related_preferences_for_real_and_doll_faces_versus_real_and_toy_objects_in_young_infants_and_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-0965(13)00136-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -