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The globalization of healthcare: implications of medical tourism for the infectious disease clinician.
Clin Infect Dis 2013; 57(12):1752-9CI

Abstract

Travel abroad for healthcare has increased rapidly; interventions include organ transplant; cardiac surgery; reproductive care; and joint, cosmetic, and dental procedures. Individuals who receive medical care abroad are a vulnerable, sentinel population, who sample the local environment and can carry home unusual and resistant infections, documented in many reports. Medical tourists are at risk for hospital-associated and procedure-related infections as well as for locally endemic infections. Patients may not volunteer details about care abroad, so clinicians must inquire about medical procedures abroad as well as recent travel. Special infection control measures may be warranted. Healthcare abroad is associated with diverse financial, legal, ethical, and health-related issues. We focus on problems the infectious disease clinician may encounter and provide a framework for evaluating returned medical tourists with suspected infections. A better system is needed to ensure broad access to high-quality health services, continuity of care, and surveillance for complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Travel Medicine Center, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23943826

Citation

Chen, Lin H., and Mary E. Wilson. "The Globalization of Healthcare: Implications of Medical Tourism for the Infectious Disease Clinician." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 57, no. 12, 2013, pp. 1752-9.
Chen LH, Wilson ME. The globalization of healthcare: implications of medical tourism for the infectious disease clinician. Clin Infect Dis. 2013;57(12):1752-9.
Chen, L. H., & Wilson, M. E. (2013). The globalization of healthcare: implications of medical tourism for the infectious disease clinician. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 57(12), pp. 1752-9. doi:10.1093/cid/cit540.
Chen LH, Wilson ME. The Globalization of Healthcare: Implications of Medical Tourism for the Infectious Disease Clinician. Clin Infect Dis. 2013;57(12):1752-9. PubMed PMID: 23943826.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The globalization of healthcare: implications of medical tourism for the infectious disease clinician. AU - Chen,Lin H, AU - Wilson,Mary E, Y1 - 2013/08/13/ PY - 2013/8/15/entrez PY - 2013/8/15/pubmed PY - 2014/8/8/medline KW - cross-border healthcare KW - healthcare globalization KW - medical tourism KW - multidrug-resistant organisms KW - transplant tourism SP - 1752 EP - 9 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 57 IS - 12 N2 - Travel abroad for healthcare has increased rapidly; interventions include organ transplant; cardiac surgery; reproductive care; and joint, cosmetic, and dental procedures. Individuals who receive medical care abroad are a vulnerable, sentinel population, who sample the local environment and can carry home unusual and resistant infections, documented in many reports. Medical tourists are at risk for hospital-associated and procedure-related infections as well as for locally endemic infections. Patients may not volunteer details about care abroad, so clinicians must inquire about medical procedures abroad as well as recent travel. Special infection control measures may be warranted. Healthcare abroad is associated with diverse financial, legal, ethical, and health-related issues. We focus on problems the infectious disease clinician may encounter and provide a framework for evaluating returned medical tourists with suspected infections. A better system is needed to ensure broad access to high-quality health services, continuity of care, and surveillance for complications. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23943826/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cid/cit540 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -