Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

An ethical analysis of mandatory influenza vaccination of health care personnel: implementing fairly and balancing benefits and burdens.
Am J Bioeth. 2013; 13(9):30-7.AJ

Abstract

Health care institutions have paid increasing attention to preventing nosocomial transmission of influenza through vaccination of health care personnel. While multifaceted voluntary interventions have increased vaccination rates, proponents of mandatory programs contend the rates remain unacceptably low. Conventional bioethical analyses of mandatory programs are inadequate; they fail to account for the obligations of nonprofessional personnel or to justify the weights assigned to different ethical principles. Using an ethics framework for public health permits a fuller analysis. The framework's focus on fairness accentuates the potential differences between the risk of transmitting infection and employment status, and the need to equitably evaluate exemptions. The framework's emphasis on balancing benefits and burdens highlights the need to justify a specific goal and questions the need to exclude all nonmedical exemptions. While mandatory vaccination programs are justifiable, greater attention should be paid to their implementation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ethics Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. armand.antommaria@cchmc.org

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23952830

Citation

Antommaria, Armand H Matheny. "An Ethical Analysis of Mandatory Influenza Vaccination of Health Care Personnel: Implementing Fairly and Balancing Benefits and Burdens." The American Journal of Bioethics : AJOB, vol. 13, no. 9, 2013, pp. 30-7.
Antommaria AH. An ethical analysis of mandatory influenza vaccination of health care personnel: implementing fairly and balancing benefits and burdens. Am J Bioeth. 2013;13(9):30-7.
Antommaria, A. H. (2013). An ethical analysis of mandatory influenza vaccination of health care personnel: implementing fairly and balancing benefits and burdens. The American Journal of Bioethics : AJOB, 13(9), 30-7. https://doi.org/10.1080/15265161.2013.814731
Antommaria AH. An Ethical Analysis of Mandatory Influenza Vaccination of Health Care Personnel: Implementing Fairly and Balancing Benefits and Burdens. Am J Bioeth. 2013;13(9):30-7. PubMed PMID: 23952830.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An ethical analysis of mandatory influenza vaccination of health care personnel: implementing fairly and balancing benefits and burdens. A1 - Antommaria,Armand H Matheny, PY - 2013/8/20/entrez PY - 2013/8/21/pubmed PY - 2013/12/16/medline SP - 30 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of bioethics : AJOB JO - Am J Bioeth VL - 13 IS - 9 N2 - Health care institutions have paid increasing attention to preventing nosocomial transmission of influenza through vaccination of health care personnel. While multifaceted voluntary interventions have increased vaccination rates, proponents of mandatory programs contend the rates remain unacceptably low. Conventional bioethical analyses of mandatory programs are inadequate; they fail to account for the obligations of nonprofessional personnel or to justify the weights assigned to different ethical principles. Using an ethics framework for public health permits a fuller analysis. The framework's focus on fairness accentuates the potential differences between the risk of transmitting infection and employment status, and the need to equitably evaluate exemptions. The framework's emphasis on balancing benefits and burdens highlights the need to justify a specific goal and questions the need to exclude all nonmedical exemptions. While mandatory vaccination programs are justifiable, greater attention should be paid to their implementation. SN - 1536-0075 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23952830/An_ethical_analysis_of_mandatory_influenza_vaccination_of_health_care_personnel:_implementing_fairly_and_balancing_benefits_and_burdens_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15265161.2013.814731 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -