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Behavioral profiles of clinically referred children with intellectual giftedness.
Biomed Res Int. 2013; 2013:540153.BR

Abstract

It is common that intellectually gifted children--that is, children with an IQ ≥ 130--are referred to paediatric or child neuropsychiatry clinics for socio-emotional problems and/or school underachievement or maladjustment. These clinically-referred children with intellectual giftedness are thought to typically display internalizing problems (i.e., self-focused problems reflecting overcontrol of emotion and behavior), and to be more behaviorally impaired when "highly" gifted (IQ ≥ 145) or displaying developmental asynchrony (i.e., a heterogeneous developmental pattern, reflected in a significant verbal-performance discrepancy on IQ tests). We tested all these assumptions in 143 clinically-referred gifted children aged 8 to 12, using Wechsler's intelligence profile and the Child Behavior Checklist. Compared to a normative sample, gifted children displayed increased behavioral problems in the whole symptomatic range. Internalizing problems did not predominate over externalizing ones (i.e., acted-out problems, reflecting undercontrol of emotion and behavior), revealing a symptomatic nature of behavioral syndromes more severe than expected. "Highly gifted" children did not display more behavioral problems than the "low gifted." Gifted children with a significant verbal-performance discrepancy displayed more externalizing problems and mixed behavioral syndromes than gifted children without such a discrepancy. These results suggest that developmental asynchrony matters when examining emotional and behavioral problems in gifted children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

CHU de Caen, Service de Psychiatrie de l'Enfant et de l'Adolescent, avenue Clemenceau, 14033 Caen Cedex 9, France. guenole fabian@yahoo.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23956988

Citation

Guénolé, Fabian, et al. "Behavioral Profiles of Clinically Referred Children With Intellectual Giftedness." BioMed Research International, vol. 2013, 2013, p. 540153.
Guénolé F, Louis J, Creveuil C, et al. Behavioral profiles of clinically referred children with intellectual giftedness. Biomed Res Int. 2013;2013:540153.
Guénolé, F., Louis, J., Creveuil, C., Baleyte, J. M., Montlahuc, C., Fourneret, P., & Revol, O. (2013). Behavioral profiles of clinically referred children with intellectual giftedness. BioMed Research International, 2013, 540153. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/540153
Guénolé F, et al. Behavioral Profiles of Clinically Referred Children With Intellectual Giftedness. Biomed Res Int. 2013;2013:540153. PubMed PMID: 23956988.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Behavioral profiles of clinically referred children with intellectual giftedness. AU - Guénolé,Fabian, AU - Louis,Jacqueline, AU - Creveuil,Christian, AU - Baleyte,Jean-Marc, AU - Montlahuc,Claire, AU - Fourneret,Pierre, AU - Revol,Olivier, Y1 - 2013/07/10/ PY - 2013/04/21/received PY - 2013/06/15/revised PY - 2013/06/15/accepted PY - 2013/8/20/entrez PY - 2013/8/21/pubmed PY - 2014/4/8/medline SP - 540153 EP - 540153 JF - BioMed research international JO - Biomed Res Int VL - 2013 N2 - It is common that intellectually gifted children--that is, children with an IQ ≥ 130--are referred to paediatric or child neuropsychiatry clinics for socio-emotional problems and/or school underachievement or maladjustment. These clinically-referred children with intellectual giftedness are thought to typically display internalizing problems (i.e., self-focused problems reflecting overcontrol of emotion and behavior), and to be more behaviorally impaired when "highly" gifted (IQ ≥ 145) or displaying developmental asynchrony (i.e., a heterogeneous developmental pattern, reflected in a significant verbal-performance discrepancy on IQ tests). We tested all these assumptions in 143 clinically-referred gifted children aged 8 to 12, using Wechsler's intelligence profile and the Child Behavior Checklist. Compared to a normative sample, gifted children displayed increased behavioral problems in the whole symptomatic range. Internalizing problems did not predominate over externalizing ones (i.e., acted-out problems, reflecting undercontrol of emotion and behavior), revealing a symptomatic nature of behavioral syndromes more severe than expected. "Highly gifted" children did not display more behavioral problems than the "low gifted." Gifted children with a significant verbal-performance discrepancy displayed more externalizing problems and mixed behavioral syndromes than gifted children without such a discrepancy. These results suggest that developmental asynchrony matters when examining emotional and behavioral problems in gifted children. SN - 2314-6141 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23956988/Behavioral_profiles_of_clinically_referred_children_with_intellectual_giftedness_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/540153 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -