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Sodium iron EDTA and ascorbic acid, but not polyphenol oxidase treatment, counteract the strong inhibitory effect of polyphenols from brown sorghum on the absorption of fortification iron in young women.
Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb; 111(3):481-9.BJ

Abstract

In addition to phytate, polyphenols (PP) might contribute to low Fe bioavailability from sorghum-based foods. To investigate the inhibitory effects of sorghum PP on Fe absorption and the potential enhancing effects of ascorbic acid (AA), NaFeEDTA and the PP oxidase enzyme laccase, we carried out three Fe absorption studies in fifty young women consuming dephytinised Fe-fortified test meals based on white and brown sorghum varieties with different PP concentrations. Fe absorption was measured as the incorporation of stable Fe isotopes into erythrocytes. In study 1, Fe absorption from meals with 17 mg PP (8·5%) was higher than that from meals with 73 mg PP (3·2%) and 167 mg PP (2·7%; P< 0·001). Fe absorption from meals containing 73 and 167 mg PP did not differ (P= 0·9). In study 2, Fe absorption from NaFeEDTA-fortified meals (167 mg PP) was higher than that from the same meals fortified with FeSO₄ (4·6 v. 2·7%; P< 0·001), but still it was lower than that from FeSO₄-fortified meals with 17 mg PP (10·7%; P< 0·001). In study 3, laccase treatment decreased the levels of PP from 167 to 42 mg, but it did not improve absorption compared with that from meals with 167 mg PP (4·8 v. 4·6%; P= 0·4), whereas adding AA increased absorption to 13·6% (P< 0·001). These findings suggest that PP from brown sorghum contribute to low Fe bioavailability from sorghum foods and that AA and, to a lesser extent, NaFeEDTA, but not laccase, have the potential to overcome the inhibitory effect of PP and improve Fe absorption from sorghum foods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23962728

Citation

Cercamondi, Colin I., et al. "Sodium Iron EDTA and Ascorbic Acid, but Not Polyphenol Oxidase Treatment, Counteract the Strong Inhibitory Effect of Polyphenols From Brown Sorghum On the Absorption of Fortification Iron in Young Women." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 111, no. 3, 2014, pp. 481-9.
Cercamondi CI, Egli IM, Zeder C, et al. Sodium iron EDTA and ascorbic acid, but not polyphenol oxidase treatment, counteract the strong inhibitory effect of polyphenols from brown sorghum on the absorption of fortification iron in young women. Br J Nutr. 2014;111(3):481-9.
Cercamondi, C. I., Egli, I. M., Zeder, C., & Hurrell, R. F. (2014). Sodium iron EDTA and ascorbic acid, but not polyphenol oxidase treatment, counteract the strong inhibitory effect of polyphenols from brown sorghum on the absorption of fortification iron in young women. The British Journal of Nutrition, 111(3), 481-9. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114513002705
Cercamondi CI, et al. Sodium Iron EDTA and Ascorbic Acid, but Not Polyphenol Oxidase Treatment, Counteract the Strong Inhibitory Effect of Polyphenols From Brown Sorghum On the Absorption of Fortification Iron in Young Women. Br J Nutr. 2014;111(3):481-9. PubMed PMID: 23962728.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sodium iron EDTA and ascorbic acid, but not polyphenol oxidase treatment, counteract the strong inhibitory effect of polyphenols from brown sorghum on the absorption of fortification iron in young women. AU - Cercamondi,Colin I, AU - Egli,Ines M, AU - Zeder,Christophe, AU - Hurrell,Richard F, Y1 - 2013/08/20/ PY - 2013/8/22/entrez PY - 2013/8/22/pubmed PY - 2014/4/8/medline SP - 481 EP - 9 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 111 IS - 3 N2 - In addition to phytate, polyphenols (PP) might contribute to low Fe bioavailability from sorghum-based foods. To investigate the inhibitory effects of sorghum PP on Fe absorption and the potential enhancing effects of ascorbic acid (AA), NaFeEDTA and the PP oxidase enzyme laccase, we carried out three Fe absorption studies in fifty young women consuming dephytinised Fe-fortified test meals based on white and brown sorghum varieties with different PP concentrations. Fe absorption was measured as the incorporation of stable Fe isotopes into erythrocytes. In study 1, Fe absorption from meals with 17 mg PP (8·5%) was higher than that from meals with 73 mg PP (3·2%) and 167 mg PP (2·7%; P< 0·001). Fe absorption from meals containing 73 and 167 mg PP did not differ (P= 0·9). In study 2, Fe absorption from NaFeEDTA-fortified meals (167 mg PP) was higher than that from the same meals fortified with FeSO₄ (4·6 v. 2·7%; P< 0·001), but still it was lower than that from FeSO₄-fortified meals with 17 mg PP (10·7%; P< 0·001). In study 3, laccase treatment decreased the levels of PP from 167 to 42 mg, but it did not improve absorption compared with that from meals with 167 mg PP (4·8 v. 4·6%; P= 0·4), whereas adding AA increased absorption to 13·6% (P< 0·001). These findings suggest that PP from brown sorghum contribute to low Fe bioavailability from sorghum foods and that AA and, to a lesser extent, NaFeEDTA, but not laccase, have the potential to overcome the inhibitory effect of PP and improve Fe absorption from sorghum foods. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23962728/Sodium_iron_EDTA_and_ascorbic_acid_but_not_polyphenol_oxidase_treatment_counteract_the_strong_inhibitory_effect_of_polyphenols_from_brown_sorghum_on_the_absorption_of_fortification_iron_in_young_women_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114513002705/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -