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Relationship between cognitive dysfunction and behavioural symptoms in Nigerian patients with Parkinson's disease no dementia.
J Parkinsons Dis. 2013 Jan 01; 3(3):293-300.JP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is presently no information on the behavioural symptoms that are related to cognitive dysfunction in African patients with Parkinson's disease.

OBJECTIVES

This study highlights the behavioral symptoms that are related to global cognitive dysfunction without dementia, as well as the caregivers' distress they create in a population of Nigerians with idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

METHODS

Fifty patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, confirmed using the United Kingdom Parkinson's Disease Society (UKPDS) Brain Bank Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, were cross-sectionally assessed for cognitive functions using the modified Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), motor symptoms using the Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), as well as neuropsychiatric symptoms and caregivers' distress using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Additional information obtained from all the participants and their caregivers included demographic data, personal history, psychiatric history, medical history and family history. The behavioural, caregivers' distress and motor correlates of cognitive dysfunction were explored.

RESULTS

In all, 24.0% of the patients had cognitive dysfunction according to the local norm of the MMSE. Hallucinations (Chi2 = 5.556, p = 0.018) and agitation (Chi2 = 5.556, p = 0.018) were related to cognitive dysfunctions. There was more behaviour related caregivers' distress in those with cognitive dysfunction than those without (Chi2 = 2.208, p = 0.032). The MMSE scores correlated inversely with the score for rigidity (r = -0.506, p = 0.0002), bradykinesia (r = -0.592, p < 0.0001), and the UPDRS total score (r = -0.503, p = 0.0002).

CONCLUSION

The psychotic symptoms of hallucinations and agitations differentiated Parkinson's disease patients with cognitive dysfunction from those with normal cognition. Generally, the presence of behavioural symptom led to more distress in the caregivers of patients with cognitive dysfunction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23963316

Citation

Ojagbemi, Akin. "Relationship Between Cognitive Dysfunction and Behavioural Symptoms in Nigerian Patients With Parkinson's Disease No Dementia." Journal of Parkinson's Disease, vol. 3, no. 3, 2013, pp. 293-300.
Ojagbemi A. Relationship between cognitive dysfunction and behavioural symptoms in Nigerian patients with Parkinson's disease no dementia. J Parkinsons Dis. 2013;3(3):293-300.
Ojagbemi, A. (2013). Relationship between cognitive dysfunction and behavioural symptoms in Nigerian patients with Parkinson's disease no dementia. Journal of Parkinson's Disease, 3(3), 293-300. https://doi.org/10.3233/JPD-130210
Ojagbemi A. Relationship Between Cognitive Dysfunction and Behavioural Symptoms in Nigerian Patients With Parkinson's Disease No Dementia. J Parkinsons Dis. 2013 Jan 1;3(3):293-300. PubMed PMID: 23963316.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between cognitive dysfunction and behavioural symptoms in Nigerian patients with Parkinson's disease no dementia. A1 - Ojagbemi,Akin, PY - 2013/8/22/entrez PY - 2013/8/22/pubmed PY - 2014/6/18/medline SP - 293 EP - 300 JF - Journal of Parkinson's disease JO - J Parkinsons Dis VL - 3 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is presently no information on the behavioural symptoms that are related to cognitive dysfunction in African patients with Parkinson's disease. OBJECTIVES: This study highlights the behavioral symptoms that are related to global cognitive dysfunction without dementia, as well as the caregivers' distress they create in a population of Nigerians with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. METHODS: Fifty patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, confirmed using the United Kingdom Parkinson's Disease Society (UKPDS) Brain Bank Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, were cross-sectionally assessed for cognitive functions using the modified Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), motor symptoms using the Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), as well as neuropsychiatric symptoms and caregivers' distress using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Additional information obtained from all the participants and their caregivers included demographic data, personal history, psychiatric history, medical history and family history. The behavioural, caregivers' distress and motor correlates of cognitive dysfunction were explored. RESULTS: In all, 24.0% of the patients had cognitive dysfunction according to the local norm of the MMSE. Hallucinations (Chi2 = 5.556, p = 0.018) and agitation (Chi2 = 5.556, p = 0.018) were related to cognitive dysfunctions. There was more behaviour related caregivers' distress in those with cognitive dysfunction than those without (Chi2 = 2.208, p = 0.032). The MMSE scores correlated inversely with the score for rigidity (r = -0.506, p = 0.0002), bradykinesia (r = -0.592, p < 0.0001), and the UPDRS total score (r = -0.503, p = 0.0002). CONCLUSION: The psychotic symptoms of hallucinations and agitations differentiated Parkinson's disease patients with cognitive dysfunction from those with normal cognition. Generally, the presence of behavioural symptom led to more distress in the caregivers of patients with cognitive dysfunction. SN - 1877-718X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23963316/Relationship_between_cognitive_dysfunction_and_behavioural_symptoms_in_Nigerian_patients_with_Parkinson's_disease_no_dementia_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&amp;id=doi:10.3233/JPD-130210 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -