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HIV and infant feeding practices: epidemiological implications for sub-Saharan African countries.
AIDS 1990; 4(7):661-5AIDS

Abstract

In industrialized countries HIV-1-seropositive mothers who are nursing infants are advised to use artificial feeds, whilst HIV-infected women in the developing world are recommended to breast-feed. Current evidence is insufficient even to estimate the attributable risk associated with breast-feeding. There is a possibility that the policy promoted in industrialized societies will eventually become established in urban and peri-urban areas of sub-Saharan Africa. This may be defensible for some elite urban mothers providing safe artificial feeding. However, calculations of the consequence of any population-level change to bottle-feeding indicate that it would result in more deaths from infectious causes, substantially adding to the child deaths directly attributable to HIV-1 infection. These data demonstrate that there is a clear need for policy-makers and health care workers to undertake further promotion of breast-feeding despite the AIDS epidemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

African Medical and Research Foundation, Tanzania, Mwanza.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2397059

Citation

Nicoll, A, et al. "HIV and Infant Feeding Practices: Epidemiological Implications for sub-Saharan African Countries." AIDS (London, England), vol. 4, no. 7, 1990, pp. 661-5.
Nicoll A, Killewo JZ, Mgone C. HIV and infant feeding practices: epidemiological implications for sub-Saharan African countries. AIDS. 1990;4(7):661-5.
Nicoll, A., Killewo, J. Z., & Mgone, C. (1990). HIV and infant feeding practices: epidemiological implications for sub-Saharan African countries. AIDS (London, England), 4(7), pp. 661-5.
Nicoll A, Killewo JZ, Mgone C. HIV and Infant Feeding Practices: Epidemiological Implications for sub-Saharan African Countries. AIDS. 1990;4(7):661-5. PubMed PMID: 2397059.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - HIV and infant feeding practices: epidemiological implications for sub-Saharan African countries. AU - Nicoll,A, AU - Killewo,J Z, AU - Mgone,C, PY - 1990/7/1/pubmed PY - 1990/7/1/medline PY - 1990/7/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Age Factors KW - Biology KW - Breast Feeding--beneficial effects KW - Breast Feeding--side effects KW - Child Survival KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Health KW - Hiv Infections--prevention and control KW - Hiv Infections--transmission KW - Human Milk--side effects KW - Infant KW - Infant Mortality--prevention and control KW - Infant Nutrition KW - Lactation KW - Length Of Life KW - Maternal Physiology KW - Mortality KW - Nutrition KW - Physiology KW - Policy KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Population Dynamics KW - Risk Factors KW - Social Policy KW - Survivorship KW - Viral Diseases KW - Youth SP - 661 EP - 5 JF - AIDS (London, England) JO - AIDS VL - 4 IS - 7 N2 - In industrialized countries HIV-1-seropositive mothers who are nursing infants are advised to use artificial feeds, whilst HIV-infected women in the developing world are recommended to breast-feed. Current evidence is insufficient even to estimate the attributable risk associated with breast-feeding. There is a possibility that the policy promoted in industrialized societies will eventually become established in urban and peri-urban areas of sub-Saharan Africa. This may be defensible for some elite urban mothers providing safe artificial feeding. However, calculations of the consequence of any population-level change to bottle-feeding indicate that it would result in more deaths from infectious causes, substantially adding to the child deaths directly attributable to HIV-1 infection. These data demonstrate that there is a clear need for policy-makers and health care workers to undertake further promotion of breast-feeding despite the AIDS epidemic. SN - 0269-9370 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2397059/HIV_and_infant_feeding_practices:_epidemiological_implications_for_sub_Saharan_African_countries_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=2397059.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -