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Urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor: a potential biomarker for objective diagnosis of overactive bladder.
Int Urol Nephrol. 2014 Feb; 46(2):341-7.IU

Abstract

PURPOSE

To investigate the diagnostic performance of urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) as potential biomarkers for overactive bladder (OAB).

METHODS

Ninety women diagnosed with OAB and 45 normal controls without OAB were enrolled. Urine samples were collected from all subjects. Urinary BDNF and NGF levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results normalized by urinary creatinine (Cr) levels were compared between OAB groups and controls. Symptom severity was assessed using overactive bladder symptom score.

RESULTS

Urinary BDNF and NGF levels were elevated in OAB groups but not in controls. Mean (SD) baseline BDNF and NGF levels normalized by Cr levels were significantly higher in OAB subjects than in controls (20.609 ± 23.932 vs. 1.779 ± 0.729, p < 0.01) and (0.258 ± 0.264 vs. 0.081 ± 0.028, p < 0.01), respectively. Urinary BDNF/Cr levels were 80-fold higher than NGF/Cr levels in OAB subjects. Receiver operating characteristic curves for assessing urinary BDNF/Cr levels in OAB groups showed sensitivity and specificity of 93.33 and 88.89 %, respectively. Urinary BDNF levels were associated with OAB symptom severity.

CONCLUSIONS

Urinary BDNF/Cr levels are elevated in women with OAB and are significantly associated with symptom severity. No elevation of BDNF is found in women without OAB. BDNF analysis has better sensitivity than NGF in detecting OAB in subjects without other lower urinary tract disorders. Results of the present study suggest a potential role for BDNF as an objective biomarker for OAB diagnosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, The Second Affiliated Hospital to Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330006, People's Republic of China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23982767

Citation

Wang, Long-Wang, et al. "Urinary Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor: a Potential Biomarker for Objective Diagnosis of Overactive Bladder." International Urology and Nephrology, vol. 46, no. 2, 2014, pp. 341-7.
Wang LW, Han XM, Chen CH, et al. Urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor: a potential biomarker for objective diagnosis of overactive bladder. Int Urol Nephrol. 2014;46(2):341-7.
Wang, L. W., Han, X. M., Chen, C. H., Ma, Y., & Hai, B. (2014). Urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor: a potential biomarker for objective diagnosis of overactive bladder. International Urology and Nephrology, 46(2), 341-7. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11255-013-0540-x
Wang LW, et al. Urinary Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor: a Potential Biomarker for Objective Diagnosis of Overactive Bladder. Int Urol Nephrol. 2014;46(2):341-7. PubMed PMID: 23982767.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor: a potential biomarker for objective diagnosis of overactive bladder. AU - Wang,Long-Wang, AU - Han,Xiao-Min, AU - Chen,Chao-Hui, AU - Ma,Yan, AU - Hai,Bo, Y1 - 2013/08/28/ PY - 2013/06/18/received PY - 2013/08/14/accepted PY - 2013/8/29/entrez PY - 2013/8/29/pubmed PY - 2014/11/13/medline SP - 341 EP - 7 JF - International urology and nephrology JO - Int Urol Nephrol VL - 46 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate the diagnostic performance of urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) as potential biomarkers for overactive bladder (OAB). METHODS: Ninety women diagnosed with OAB and 45 normal controls without OAB were enrolled. Urine samples were collected from all subjects. Urinary BDNF and NGF levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results normalized by urinary creatinine (Cr) levels were compared between OAB groups and controls. Symptom severity was assessed using overactive bladder symptom score. RESULTS: Urinary BDNF and NGF levels were elevated in OAB groups but not in controls. Mean (SD) baseline BDNF and NGF levels normalized by Cr levels were significantly higher in OAB subjects than in controls (20.609 ± 23.932 vs. 1.779 ± 0.729, p < 0.01) and (0.258 ± 0.264 vs. 0.081 ± 0.028, p < 0.01), respectively. Urinary BDNF/Cr levels were 80-fold higher than NGF/Cr levels in OAB subjects. Receiver operating characteristic curves for assessing urinary BDNF/Cr levels in OAB groups showed sensitivity and specificity of 93.33 and 88.89 %, respectively. Urinary BDNF levels were associated with OAB symptom severity. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary BDNF/Cr levels are elevated in women with OAB and are significantly associated with symptom severity. No elevation of BDNF is found in women without OAB. BDNF analysis has better sensitivity than NGF in detecting OAB in subjects without other lower urinary tract disorders. Results of the present study suggest a potential role for BDNF as an objective biomarker for OAB diagnosis. SN - 1573-2584 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23982767/Urinary_brain_derived_neurotrophic_factor:_a_potential_biomarker_for_objective_diagnosis_of_overactive_bladder_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s11255-013-0540-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -