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Organization of sensory input to the nociceptive-specific cutaneous trunk muscle reflex in rat, an effective experimental system for examining nociception and plasticity.
J Comp Neurol. 2014 Apr 01; 522(5):1048-71.JC

Abstract

Detailed characterization of neural circuitries furthers our understanding of how nervous systems perform specific functions and allows the use of those systems to test hypotheses. We have characterized the sensory input to the cutaneous trunk muscle (CTM; also cutaneus trunci [rat] or cutaneus maximus [mouse]) reflex (CTMR), which manifests as a puckering of the dorsal thoracolumbar skin and is selectively driven by noxious stimuli. CTM electromyography and neurogram recordings in naïve rats revealed that CTMR responses were elicited by natural stimuli and electrical stimulation of all segments from C4 to L6, a much greater extent of segmental drive to the CTMR than previously described. Stimulation of some subcutaneous paraspinal tissue can also elicit this reflex. Using a selective neurotoxin, we also demonstrate differential drive of the CTMR by trkA-expressing and nonexpressing small-diameter afferents. These observations highlight aspects of the organization of the CTMR system that make it attractive for studies of nociception and anesthesiology and plasticity of primary afferents, motoneurons, and the propriospinal system. We use the CTMR system to demonstrate qualitatively and quantitatively that experimental pharmacological treatments can be compared with controls applied either to the contralateral side or to another segment, with the remaining segments providing controls for systemic or other treatment effects. These data indicate the potential for using the CTMR system as both an invasive and a noninvasive quantitative assessment tool providing improved statistical power and reduced animal use.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, 40202; Department of Neurological Surgery, Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, 40202.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23983104

Citation

Petruska, Jeffrey C., et al. "Organization of Sensory Input to the Nociceptive-specific Cutaneous Trunk Muscle Reflex in Rat, an Effective Experimental System for Examining Nociception and Plasticity." The Journal of Comparative Neurology, vol. 522, no. 5, 2014, pp. 1048-71.
Petruska JC, Barker DF, Garraway SM, et al. Organization of sensory input to the nociceptive-specific cutaneous trunk muscle reflex in rat, an effective experimental system for examining nociception and plasticity. J Comp Neurol. 2014;522(5):1048-71.
Petruska, J. C., Barker, D. F., Garraway, S. M., Trainer, R., Fransen, J. W., Seidman, P. A., Soto, R. G., Mendell, L. M., & Johnson, R. D. (2014). Organization of sensory input to the nociceptive-specific cutaneous trunk muscle reflex in rat, an effective experimental system for examining nociception and plasticity. The Journal of Comparative Neurology, 522(5), 1048-71. https://doi.org/10.1002/cne.23461
Petruska JC, et al. Organization of Sensory Input to the Nociceptive-specific Cutaneous Trunk Muscle Reflex in Rat, an Effective Experimental System for Examining Nociception and Plasticity. J Comp Neurol. 2014 Apr 1;522(5):1048-71. PubMed PMID: 23983104.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Organization of sensory input to the nociceptive-specific cutaneous trunk muscle reflex in rat, an effective experimental system for examining nociception and plasticity. AU - Petruska,Jeffrey C, AU - Barker,Darrell F, AU - Garraway,Sandra M, AU - Trainer,Robert, AU - Fransen,James W, AU - Seidman,Peggy A, AU - Soto,Roy G, AU - Mendell,Lorne M, AU - Johnson,Richard D, PY - 2013/05/18/received PY - 2013/07/18/revised PY - 2013/08/14/accepted PY - 2013/8/29/entrez PY - 2013/8/29/pubmed PY - 2014/10/7/medline KW - anesthesiology KW - animal models KW - pain KW - pharmacology KW - plasticity KW - sensory neurons KW - spinal cord SP - 1048 EP - 71 JF - The Journal of comparative neurology JO - J. Comp. Neurol. VL - 522 IS - 5 N2 - Detailed characterization of neural circuitries furthers our understanding of how nervous systems perform specific functions and allows the use of those systems to test hypotheses. We have characterized the sensory input to the cutaneous trunk muscle (CTM; also cutaneus trunci [rat] or cutaneus maximus [mouse]) reflex (CTMR), which manifests as a puckering of the dorsal thoracolumbar skin and is selectively driven by noxious stimuli. CTM electromyography and neurogram recordings in naïve rats revealed that CTMR responses were elicited by natural stimuli and electrical stimulation of all segments from C4 to L6, a much greater extent of segmental drive to the CTMR than previously described. Stimulation of some subcutaneous paraspinal tissue can also elicit this reflex. Using a selective neurotoxin, we also demonstrate differential drive of the CTMR by trkA-expressing and nonexpressing small-diameter afferents. These observations highlight aspects of the organization of the CTMR system that make it attractive for studies of nociception and anesthesiology and plasticity of primary afferents, motoneurons, and the propriospinal system. We use the CTMR system to demonstrate qualitatively and quantitatively that experimental pharmacological treatments can be compared with controls applied either to the contralateral side or to another segment, with the remaining segments providing controls for systemic or other treatment effects. These data indicate the potential for using the CTMR system as both an invasive and a noninvasive quantitative assessment tool providing improved statistical power and reduced animal use. SN - 1096-9861 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23983104/Organization_of_sensory_input_to_the_nociceptive_specific_cutaneous_trunk_muscle_reflex_in_rat_an_effective_experimental_system_for_examining_nociception_and_plasticity_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cne.23461 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -